Category: Dissemination / Implementation

Symposium

Symposium 124 - Indications for Adaptations to Evidence-Based Practices in Community Mental Health

Sunday, November 19
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Location: Sapphire Ballroom B, Level 4, Sapphire Level

Keywords: Child | Dissemination | Implementation
Presentation Type: Symposium

It has become clear that evidence-based practices (EBPs) are routinely being adapted when implemented in community settings, but we lack an understanding of what drives community therapist adaptations to children’s EBPs. Indeed, Chambers and Norton (2016) have called for developing an “adaptome” data platform to identify adaptations to EBPs and their related impacts on outcomes.

In this symposium, two studies will focus on process themes that arise in community implementation of EBPs, which indicate potential adaptations for low-income, diverse children. The second two speakers will present a framework based on work by Stirman et al. (2015) that defines adaptations as augmenting or reducing/reordering the delivery of components of EBPs. These studies will reveal community therapists’ reasons for making these adaptations. Each talk will highlight implications for implementation efforts. Dr. Anna Lau, an expert in cultural adaptations of EBP and implementation science, will serve as the discussant.


First, Kodish et al. will discuss qualitative themes that emerged in the delivery of Interpersonal Therapy- Adolescent Skills Training (IPT-AST). Process themes differed when groups included low-income, ethnically diverse students versus middle-class, European American students. Implications for how therapists can accommodate differences in adolescent class and culture within IPT-AST will be discussed.


Next, Gellatly et al. will discuss therapist and client characteristics that are associated with barriers to engagement and difficulties implementing multiple EBPs within a large-scale roll-out. Therapist attitudes towards EBPs were associated with the barriers they perceived in sessions. Furthermore, perceived barriers related to reported difficulties implementing the EBP as intended. Strategies to support therapists in engaging families within EBP delivery will be discussed.


Third, Barnett et al. will describe a framework classifying the adaptations therapists make to EBPs using data from a mixed-method study of a system-driven implementation of multiple EBPs for children. Discussion will focus on the types of augmenting and reducing/reordering adaptations therapists made across EBPs, and the reasons these modifications. Implications for the large-scale dissemination and implementation of EBPs will be addressed.


Finally, Dyson et al. will describe a mixed-method study on the types of, and reasons for, adaptation of AIM-HI, a mental health intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder. Most adaptations described involved augmenting care to enhance client-intervention fit or therapist-intervention fit. Implications for therapist training will be discussed. 

Learning Objectives:

Miya Barnett

Assistant Professor
University of California, Santa Barbara

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Miya Barnett

Lauren Brookman-Frazee

Associate Professor
University of California, San Diego

Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Lauren Brookman-Frazee

    Send Email for Tamar Kodish

    Resham Gellatly

    Graduate Student
    UCLA

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Resham Gellatly

    Miya Barnett

    Assistant Professor
    University of California, Santa Barbara

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Miya Barnett

    Margaret Dyson

    Senior Project Researcher
    University of California, San Diego

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Margaret Dyson


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