Category: Comorbidity - Anxiety and Other

Symposium

Symposium 97 - How Can Ecological Momentary Assessment Help Us Understand Mood and Anxiety Pathology Better?

Saturday, November 18
1:45 PM - 3:15 PM
Location: Aqua Salon E & F, Level 3, Aqua Level

Keywords: Ecological Momentary Assessment | Emotion | Comorbidity
Presentation Type: Symposium

EMA, encompassing daily diary and random or event-based experience sampling, provides unique advantages for enhancing understanding of mood and anxiety pathology. By repeatedly sampling subjects’ experiences in real time, in their natural environments, EMA allows us to capture dynamic emotional processes across situational and temporal contexts. This method also helps to reduce recall bias, and offers opportunities to examine how micro-level processes (e.g., daily stress) are related to symptom severity, comorbidity, or long-term changes in mood and anxiety symptoms. In the current symposium, we will present five empirical studies covering a range of theoretical constructs, temporal contexts, and questions that can be addressed through EMA. These studies also have direct clinical implications for improving assessment and identifying treatment targets in practice.  

The first 2 papers focus on understanding phenomenology and symptoms of disorders in daily life. Study 1 uses 7-day EMA data to examine daily meta-emotions in relation to depression severity. Meta-emotions, especially reactivity to one’s negative emotions, were associated with higher depression severity. The second paper presents 3x/day EMA over 7 days assessing phenotypes of youth with disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD). Irritable mood and temper outbursts, the core symptoms of DMDD, will be assessed as well as their specificity to DMDD relative to ADHD or anxiety disorders. This study also includes informant-report from parents, examining parenting behaviors as moderators of irritability.

The next 3 papers present different approaches to examining comorbidity between anxiety and depression using EMA. The third paper focuses on how variability in depressed mood, considered an indicator for emotion regulation deficits, predicts elevation in anxiety symptoms. In a 1x/hour EMA study over 7 days, variability in momentary depressed mood predicted higher depression and anxiety across the week. The relationship between depression variability and later anxiety elevation was only significant for participants with depression, but not controls. The fourth paper examines comorbidity between anxiety and depression at the level of daily covariation, using 3x/week diary data over 5 weeks. The degree of anxiety-depression covariation varied across individuals, and higher generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), but not depression symptoms, and situational stressors predicted stronger covariation. The final paper combines longitudinal data with 8-day daily diary data to examine daily emotion regulation variables as mediators of long-term maintenance and sequential comorbidity between depression and GAD. Whereas high mean negative affect and low mean positive affect were more predictive of the maintenance and development of comorbid depression later, higher reactivity to stressors and daily fluctuations in negative emotions were more related to the maintenance and development of comorbid GAD.

Lastly, Dr. Rudi de Raedt whose work utilized a wide range of innovative methods including EMA to study affective disorders, will discuss clinical implications of the findings and methodological considerations for future research. 

Learning Objectives:

Michelle G. Newman

Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry
The Pennsylvania State University

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Michelle Newman

Ki Eun Shin

Doctoral Student
The Pennsylvania State University

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Ki Eun Shin

Send Email for Rudi De Raedt

Natasha M. Haradhvala

Doctoral Student
Washington University in St. Louis

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Natasha Haradhvala

Katharina Kircanski

Research Fellow
Emotion and Development Branch, NIMH

Presentation(s):

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Nicholas C. Jacobson

Graduate student
The Pennsylvania State University

Presentation(s):

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Thane M. Erickson

Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology
Seattle Pacific University

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Thane Erickson

Ki Eun Shin

Doctoral Student
The Pennsylvania State University

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Ki Eun Shin


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