Category: Treatment - Other

Symposium

Symposium 103 - Electrophysiological Correlates of Treatment Outcomes for Youth Populations

Saturday, November 18
1:45 PM - 3:15 PM
Location: Cobalt 501, Level 5, Cobalt Level

Keywords: Child | Psychotherapy Outcome | Psychophysiology
Presentation Type: Symposium

Recent innovations in outcome assessment for evidence-based interventions have focused on development of metrics that are less reliant on subjective perceptions of change, including the use of neural and other obligatory constructs (Aldao & De Los Reyes, 2015). Moreover, examining the ability of evidence-based treatments to impact outcomes across multiple units of analysis adds a convergent metric of intervention efficacy, an essential component of the NIMH’s Research Domain Criteria framework (Insel et al., 2010). Such an approach can offer specific insights into the mechanisms putatively impacted by a given intervention, and provides a way to identify potential processes supporting maintenance of effects over time, particularly during childhood and adolescence when dramatic and dynamic neurophysiological changes occur. One such approach is the event-related potential (ERP) technique, which extracts precisely time-locked responses to stimuli from the scalp-derived electroencephalogram (EEG). The field has recently begun to employ ERPs as indices of treatment prediction and outcomes, but little of this work has yet extended to youth populations.


Consistent with this year’s Convention theme, “Applying CBT in Diverse Contexts,” this symposium will highlight recent advancements in treatment research on CBT and related treatments for three distinct youth populations. This symposium will focus on application of electrophysiology as predictors and targets of intervention outcomes, thereby bridging the gap between basic research and clinical assessment and pointing toward development and evaluation of personalized treatments (Aldao & De Los Reyes, 2015; Craighead, 2016).   


The first presentation will discuss the application of ERPs as a predictor of changes following the primary treatments for children with anxiety and depression: CBT and pharmacological treatment (Katie Burkhouse, PhD). The second presentation will extend the demonstrated use of ERPs by examining them (as well as peer sociometrics) as an outcome measure in the first known attention-controlled RCT designed evaluate the specific effects of the core activities of an evidence-based social skills intervention for youth with autism spectrum disorder (Erin Kang, MA). The third presentation will further elucidate the use of ERPs as treatment metrics by examining not only proximal but also long-term ERP and other EEG-indexed changes following a combined CBT and parent management treatment program for children with externalizing problems in responders vs. non-responders (Steven Woltering, PhD). The Discussant (Greg Hajcak, PhD) will provide integrative insight across these various studies, linking it to contemporary methodology in both ERP and intervention research.

Learning Objectives:

Erin Kang

Stony Brook University

Presentation(s):

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Matthew D. Lerner

Assistant Professor of Psychology, Psychiatry, & Pediatrics
Stony Brook University

Presentation(s):

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Greg Hajcak

Florida State University

Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Greg Hajcak

    Katie L. Burkhouse

    Postdoctoral Fellow
    University of Illinois at Chicago

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Katie Burkhouse

    Erin Kang

    Stony Brook University

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Erin Kang

    Steven Woltering

    Texas A & M University

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Steven Woltering


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