Category: Trauma and Stressor Related Disorders and Disasters

Symposium

Symposium 143 - Diversity of Response to Trauma and to Trauma-Focused Treatment

Sunday, November 19
10:15 AM - 11:45 AM
Location: Cobalt 500, Level 5, Cobalt Level

Keywords: Trauma | Risk / Vulnerability Factors | Emotion
Presentation Type: Symposium

Research on trauma response and trauma-focused treatment has evolved to encompass a great variety of trauma types and potential mechanisms of response to both trauma and treatment. A diversity of mechanisms may contribute to the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and to individuals’ responses to treatment for PTSD. Moreover, a diversity of responses beyond PTSD may occur following trauma. This growing knowledge has contributed to a broadening of perspectives on human response to trauma, including moving PTSD to its own class of disorders in the DSM and a broader array of treatment targets for those who experience mental health problems subsequent to trauma.


This symposium includes four presentations that provide further examination of the varied phenomenon of trauma response. The samples draw from diverse types of populations, trauma types, and settings, and focus on a variety of potential responses and mechanisms of response. First, Lauren Paige and colleagues present data from 133 Army soldiers who experienced either threat-based trauma or moral injury-based trauma while deployed. Findings indicate that these types of trauma are associated with different emotional responses, and that different emotional responses account for the links of those traumas with PTSD symptoms. Next, in a sample of adult women who experience intimate partner violence, Alexandra Lipinski and colleagues examine prior history of childhood abuse and current feelings of shame as potential explanations for comorbidity of PTSD and social anxiety disorder. Third, Todd Kashdan and colleagues present findings from daily diary data from college students who reported nonconsensual sex during the diary study itself. Results focus on emotional and behavioral response to nonconsensual sex, as well as baseline predictors of experiencing nonconsensual sex. Finally, Alissa Jerud and colleagues evaluated emotion regulation difficulties as a predictor of response to simultaneous treatment for PTSD and smoking cessation treatment in a sample of smokers with PTSD. Results suggested that emotion regulation problems were predictive of poorer PTSD treatment response but not smoking cessation. After these talks, Marylene Cloitre will provide thoughts on how these findings highlight the diversity of mechanisms of trauma response and response to trauma-focused treatment.

Learning Objectives:

Keith D. Renshaw

Associate Professor
George Mason University

Presentation(s):

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    Lauren Paige

    Doctoral Student
    George Mason University

    Presentation(s):

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    Marylene Cloitre

    National Center for PTSD Dissemination and Training Division, Palo Alto VA Health Care Services

    Presentation(s):

      Send Email for Marylene Cloitre

      Lauren Paige

      Doctoral Student
      George Mason University

      Presentation(s):

      Send Email for Lauren Paige

      Alexandra J. Lipinski

      Graduate Student
      University of Memphis

      Presentation(s):

      Send Email for Alexandra Lipinski

      Todd Kashdan

      Professor of Psychology
      George Mason University

      Presentation(s):

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      Alissa B. Jerud

      Postdoctoral Fellow
      University of Pennsylvania, Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety

      Presentation(s):

      Send Email for Alissa Jerud


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