Category: Child / Adolescent - Anxiety

Symposium

Symposium 123 - Designing and Disseminating Large-Scale Interventions for Anxiety in Youth

Sunday, November 19
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Location: Sapphire Ballroom A, Level 4, Sapphire Level

Keywords: Technology / Mobile Health | Adolescent Anxiety | Health Care System
Presentation Type: Symposium

Anxiety is the most prevalent and least treated mental health problem in children and adolescents. Furthermore, racial and ethnic minority youth suffer from anxiety disorders at rates equivalent to or higher than non-Hispanic white youth and are treated at even lower rates. In this symposium, we discuss issues in designing and disseminating large-scale interventions to target this undertreated population of anxious youth and to address ethnic disparities in access to and engagement in evidence-based interventions for anxiety. Data are drawn from three diverse investigations. In the first presentation, Dr. Frances Lynch will describe patterns of medical and mental health service use of anxious versus non-anxious youth enrolled in health systems participating in the NIH Mental Health Research Network. In preliminary analyses of 17,929 children and adolescents, anxious youth were high utilizers of care across sectors, including increased use of high cost services. In the final sample of 100,000+ youth, racial and ethnic disparities in the use of services will be probed and recommendations made for service setting (e.g., primary care) that may be low-disparity access points to engage anxious youth in treatment.  The second presentation by Dr. Greg Clarke describes a large (target n = 498) in-progress effectiveness trial of an internet-based cognitive bias modification program for adolescent anxiety. Youths in this study are identified through clinical diagnoses in health system records and recruited for participation in the trial over the telephone. In his presentation, Dr. Clarke will report on clinical and demographic predictors of consent to enrollment and uptake of the intervention by the families of anxious teens. In initial analyses, race did not predict differential uptake, but Hispanic youth did decline participation at greater rates than Non-Hispanic while youths. In the final presentation, Dr. Patricia Lester will present data on the characteristics of anxious youth and parents and anxiety outcomes for their large-scale prevention program for military families. In preliminary analyses of 3,810 youths, the program successfully impacted both parental and youth anxiety and reduced symptoms for both military and civilian parents. In the final presentation, ethnic effects will be probed and the value of a strengths-based resiliency program discussed. Across these presentations, Dr. Joel Sherrill of NIH will discussion implications for the design and dissemination of large-scale interventions for anxious youth.

Learning Objectives:

V. Robin Weersing

Professor
San Diego State University

Presentation(s):

Send Email for V. Robin Weersing

Joel Sherrill

Deputy Director, Division of Services & Intervention Research
National Institute of Mental Health

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Joel Sherrill

Frances Lynch

Senior Investigator
Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Frances Lynch

Greg Clarke

Senior Investigator
Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Greg Clarke

Patricia Lester

Professor-in-Residence
UCLA Division of Population Behavioral Health, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Patricia Lester


Assets

Symposium 123 - Designing and Disseminating Large-Scale Interventions for Anxiety in Youth



Attendees who have favorited this

Please enter your access key

The asset you are trying to access is locked. Please enter your access key to unlock.

Send Email for Designing and Disseminating Large-Scale Interventions for Anxiety in Youth