Category: Parenting / Families

Symposium

Symposium 51 - Culture and Parenting Practices in Latina Mothers of Young Children: Implications for Parent Training Programs

Friday, November 17
3:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Location: Sapphire Ballroom O & P, Level 4, Sapphire Level

Keywords: Hispanic American/ Latinx | Parent Training | Child
Presentation Type: Symposium

Parenting interventions (i.e., parent training programs) are widely considered the gold standard treatment for a number of child mental health problems, particularly disruptive behavior problems in early childhood.  These interventions are based on a wealth of research that emphasizes two primary dimensions of childrearing: nurturance (i.e., responsiveness, acceptance, warmth) and demandingness (i.e., control, discipline; Maccoby & Martin, 1983).  Meta-analyses support the universal importance of parenting in shaping child development (Khaleque & Rohner, 2012). Still, while parental acceptanceappears to promote optimal development across cultures, parental discipline and its effectson child development may be more likely to vary cross-culturally (Lansford, Chang, Dodge, Malone, Oburu, Palmérus et al., 2005).  Thus, although authoritarian parenting—with its high levels of demandingness enforced through strict discipline—has long been considered maladaptive, much debate surrounds the cross-cultural generalizability of these conclusions. 


 Approximately 1 in 4 children in the U.S. comes from a Latino family. Approximately 65% of the Latino population in the U.S. is Mexican-origin, but the general population is diverse on a host of demographic variables including country of origin, language use, immigration, and acculturation status. The tremendous heterogeneity of the population, the challenges in operationalizing cultural constructs, and disagreement over the conceptualization of parenting itself makes the study of Latino parenting complex.  As a result, limited consensus regarding Latino parenting and its relation to child development currently exists. Is authoritarian parenting—with its the use of discipline practices that may be considered harsh—normative within Latino culture? How does authoritarian parenting, and the use of harsh practices in particular, influence young Latino children? Answers to these questions seem to depend on the cultural context of the Latino parent and child, and are necessary to inform parenting interventions with Latino families.  The proposed symposium aims to increase understanding of mechanisms that shape parenting and ultimately, child mental health in the large, growing and diverse Latino population.  Discussion will integrate findings across studies and center on how to address cultural processes in parent training programs.


 


 


 

Learning Objectives:

Esther Calzada

Associate Professor
University of Texas at Austin

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Esther Calzada

Esteban Cardemil

Clark University

Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Esteban Cardemil

    R. Gabriela Barajas-Gonzalez

    Assistant Professor
    New York University

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for R. Gabriela Barajas-Gonzalez

    Catherine LaBrenz

    Doctoral Student
    University of Texas at Austin

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Catherine LaBrenz


    Assets

    Symposium 51 - Culture and Parenting Practices in Latina Mothers of Young Children: Implications for Parent Training Programs



    Attendees who have favorited this

    Please enter your access key

    The asset you are trying to access is locked. Please enter your access key to unlock.

    Send Email for Culture and Parenting Practices in Latina Mothers of Young Children: Implications for Parent Training Programs