Category: Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders

Symposium

Symposium 66 - Cognitive Control, IQ, and Inattention in OCD

Saturday, November 18
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Location: Sapphire Ballroom A, Level 4, Sapphire Level

Keywords: OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) | Neuroscience | Clinical Utility
Presentation Type: Symposium

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by distressing, unwanted thoughts known as obsessions, and difficult-to-control behaviors known as compulsions. Cognitive-behavioral models of OCD aim to explain why people with OCD struggle to regulate their thoughts and behaviors, with the ultimate goal of identifying novel targets to improve treatment outcomes.  This symposium will describe new experimental and meta-analytic findings on cognitive functioning in OCD and the relationship of specific facets of cognitive functioning to obsessions, compulsions, inattention symptoms and treatment outcome in OCD.  


This symposium will include four presentations, each of which empirically examines a different facet of cognitive functioning in OCD.  Using a variety of methods (experimental psychopathology; treatment outcome; meta-analysis), the present talks link cognitive functioning to the onset, maintenance, or treatment of OCD, with the ultimate goal of enhancing diagnostic accuracy, and treatment, and paving the way for new and exciting lines of research.


In the first presentation, Dr. Lauren Hallion will present experimental data on “cold” (non-emotional) and “hot” (emotional) proactive and reactive cognitive control and their relationship to obsessions in patients with OCD.  In the second presentation, Dr. Eyal Klanthroff will present results from a series of studies that identify task control deficits in individuals with OCD and offer preliminary evidence for the efficacy of cognitive training as an augmented protocol to CBT in OCD. In the third presentation, Mr. Andrew Guzik will present results from a pediatric clinical trial indicating that cognitive-behavioral treatment for OCD has a concurrent positive effect on 'ADHD-like' inattention symptoms. Finally, Dr. Amitai Abramovitch will present results from the first meta-analysis focusing on IQ in OCD, disentangling a 120 year old myth implicating higher than normal IQ in OCD. The results of this study reveal two important considerations: First, that symptoms severity may be associated with reduced IQ, and that slowed processing speed may negatively impact performance IQ, but not verbal IQ.  Dr. David Tolin, an internationally-recognized leader in OCD treatment and research, will serve as the discussant.


Together, these presentations and the resulting discussion will provide a strong overview of contemporary understandings of neurocognitive functioning in OCD and will situate specific empirical findings within the broader theoretical and clinical literature. 

Learning Objectives:

Lauren S. Hallion

University of Pittsburgh

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Lauren Hallion

Amitai Abramovitch

Assistant Professor
Texas State University

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Amitai Abramovitch

Dean McKay

Professor
Fordham University

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Dean McKay

Lauren S. Hallion

University of Pittsburgh

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Lauren Hallion

Amitai Abramovitch

Assistant Professor
Texas State University

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Amitai Abramovitch

Eyal Kalanthroff

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Eyal Kalanthroff

Andrew Guzick

Graduate Student
University of Florida

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Andrew Guzick


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