Category: Technology

Symposium

Symposium 33 - Lessons on Behavioral Intervention Technologies for Depression and Anxiety in Children, Adolescents, and Adults

Friday, November 17
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Location: Sapphire Ballroom O & P, Level 4, Sapphire Level

Keywords: Technology / Mobile Health | Adolescent Depression | Adult Depression
Presentation Type: Symposium

The popularity of Behavioral Intervention Technologies (BITs) for the treatment and prevention of depression and anxiety is growing rapidly (Mohr, Burns, Schueller, Clarke, & Klinkman, 2013).  Several meta-analyses have demonstrated the efficacy of BITs for adult depression and anxiety (Andersson & Cuijpers, 2009; Spek et al., 2007; Griffith et al, 2010). However, given the relative novelty of BITs, more research is needed to better understand best practices for conducting research on BITs and for developing interventions to maximize recruitment, engagement, and retention. Indeed, some studies have shown that BITs may suffer from poor engagement and retention (Christensen et al., 2006), and that the dropout from follow-up may be considerable (Leykin et al., 2014). Gaining a better understanding of best practices for development of BITs as well as for conducting clinical trials on BITs is likely to advance the science of BITs considerable. Additionally, most research on the effectiveness of BITs for anxiety and depression have been conducted with adults, and effectiveness of BITs for child and adolescent anxiety and depression, especially in comparison to established treatments, like cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), is not well understood. Considering that children and adolescents are perhaps the most enthusiastic and engaged users of digital technologies, this is clearly an important demographic to target for research on the efficacy and effectiveness of BITs.  



The papers presented in this symposium aim to both advance the science of BITs by focusing on developing best practices for BITs development and evaluation, as well as address the gap in the knowledge of BITs effectiveness in relation to CBT for child and adolescent anxiety and depression.  Thus, we will present the outcomes of two meta-analyses: 1) a meta-analysis comparing BITS, CBT, and BITs+ CBT for anxiety in children and adolescents; and 2) a similar meta-analysis comparing BITS to CBT for depression in children and adolescents. Additionally, we will present three papers concerning important lessons for researchers who may be considering developing and evaluating their own BIT, including; 1) a randomized controlled trial of a brief unsupported Internet intervention for mood management for adults recruited through Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT); 2) an investigation regarding the effectiveness of phone calls to decrease follow-up attrition; and 3) a study comparing two recruitment avenues (social media vs AMT) vis-a-vis the reliability of responses.

Learning Objectives:

Eduardo L. Bunge

Associate Professor
Palo Alto University

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Stephen Schueller

Assistant Professor
Northwestern University

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Charlotte L. Beard

Graduate Student
Palo Alto University

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Megan Jones

Palo Alto University

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Eduardo L. Bunge

Associate Professor
Palo Alto University

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Alinne Z. Barrera

Associate Professor
Palo Alto University

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Haley Cook

Palo Alto University

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