Category: Cognitive Science / Cognitive Processes

Symposium

Symposium 98 - New Frontiers in Cognitive Training and Cognitive Bias Modification

Saturday, November 18
1:45 PM - 3:15 PM
Location: Sapphire Ballroom A, Level 4, Sapphire Level

Keywords: Cognitive Processes | Cognitive Biases / Distortions | Neurocognitive Therapies
Presentation Type: Symposium

Over the past two decades, there has been a burgeoning interest in computerized cognitive interventions for psychological disorders. These studies represent an exciting translational endeavor between basic cognitive science and clinical research: findings broadly show that remediation of specific cognitive deficits may result in symptom reduction (cognitive control training, c.f. Siegle et al., 2007) and that targeting affective biases in attention and interpretation may also reduce symptoms of mood and anxiety disorders (cognitive bias modification, c.f. Hertel & Mathews, 2011).

However, several recent meta-analytic reviews have tempered enthusiasm for the clinical applicability of cognitive training. Some evidence shows that clinical effect of such interventions on symptoms are small and highly variable across studies (Mogoase et al., 2014) and that clinical effects of some types of training may be not be observed when clients use cognitive training outside of controlled laboratory settings (Price et al., 2016). These results point to the need for a more nuanced approach to implementing cognitive training interventions in the real world. In addition, these findings suggest that more research is needed on the specific mechanisms underlying symptoms that are most amenable to change via cognitive interventions.

The goals of this symposium are to highlight ways in which researchers are diversifying the study of computerized cognitive interventions via (1) new treatment targets and (2) strategies for implementing these interventions in multiple contexts, including both clinical and laboratory-based settings. For the first goal, treatment targets to be presented include impulsive reactivity to emotion (Peckham), emotion regulation (Hoorelbeke), anxiety sensitivity (Dr. Beadel), psychophysiological reactivity (Dr. Baker), and the moderating effects of age on training outcomes (Dr. Beard). For the second goal, presentations will describe implementation of cognitive interventions across several contexts including integration with outpatient CBT, integration with a CBT-based partial hospitalization program, training delivered online, and laboratory-based studies of novel applications of cognitive interventions.

The research presented in this symposium encompass all three major approaches to computerized cognitive interventions: cognitive bias modification for both attention and interpretation bias and cognitive control training, with a discussion led by an expert in this field, Dr. Nader Amir. These presentations include studies varying in both diagnostic composition of participants and severity of current symptoms, allowing for a discussion of the commonalities and differences in applying cognitive training and bias modification across disorders.

Learning Objectives:

Andrew D. Peckham

Clinical Psychology Intern and Clinical Fellow
McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Andrew Peckham

Nader Amir

Professor
San Diego State University

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Nader Amir

Andrew D. Peckham

Clinical Psychology Intern and Clinical Fellow
McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Andrew Peckham

Kristof Hoorelbeke

PhD student
Ghent University

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Kristof Hoorelbeke

Jessica R. Beadel

University of Cincinnati

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Jessica Beadel

Amanda W. Baker

Clinical Psychologist, Instructor in Psychology
Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Amanda Baker

Courtney Beard

Assistant Professor
McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Courtney Beard


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