Category: Transdiagnostic

Symposium

Symposium 25 - Emotion Regulation in Child Development: Clinically Relevant Outcomes From Infancy Through Adolescence

Friday, November 17
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Location: Aqua 310, Level 3, Aqua Level

Keywords: Emotion Regulation | Child | Adolescents
Presentation Type: Symposium

Developmental researchers define emotion regulation (ER) as the intrinsic and extrinsic processes involved in monitoring, evaluating, and modifying emotional reactions to accomplish one’s goals (Thompson, 1994; Thompson & Calkins, 1996). Theoretical and empirical literature emphasize the central role of ER in both adaptive and maladaptive outcomes, with adaptive ER considered integral to normative development (Cole et al., 1994; Fox, 1994) and ER difficulties considered a primary mechanism underlying numerous mental and physical health problems (Gratz et al., in press). Yet, despite the rapid growth of research in this area in recent years, the role of ER in diverse outcomes across development remains unclear and further research is needed. Given that the development of adaptive ER is a major developmental milestone of childhood (Saarni, 1979; Southam-Gerow & Kendall, 2002), research on the relation of ER to clinically-relevant outcomes across childhood is particularly important and has the potential to improve our understanding of the broader impact of early ER difficulties. Indeed, given evidence that ER difficulties in early development can influence and persist through later development (Calkins, 1994; Eisenberg et al., 2010), research on ER throughout childhood may provide a context for understanding ER difficulties and their consequences in adulthood.


The primary objective of this symposium is to present innovative research on the relation of ER to understudied outcomes from infancy through adolescence. The first presentation describes a study examining the relation of maternal prenatal ER to both infant temperament and impaired mother-infant bonding at one-month postpartum. This study provides support for the relevance of maternal ER during pregnancy to early infant outcomes. The second presentation describes a study examining how ER in late infancy/toddlerhood predicts clinically-relevant outcomes at age four in the context of stressful life events, highlighting the importance of early ER difficulties to later childhood outcomes. The third presentation examines the relation of specific facets of ER (and their interaction) to both deliberate self-harm and suicidal ideation among adolescents in inpatient treatment. Finally, the fourth presentation examines the role of ER in treatment outcomes among adolescents in residential treatment, providing support for the mediating role of change in ER in the relation between baseline borderline personality pathology and improvements in psychiatric symptoms during treatment.


Dr. Alice Carter, a renowned expert in socio-emotional child development, will synthesize the findings of the presented studies and highlight their implications for understanding both risk and resilience in youth. 

Learning Objectives:

Kim L. Gratz

Professor and Chair
University of Toledo

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Kim Gratz

Alice S. Carter

Professor
University of Massachusetts Boston

Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Alice Carter

    Laura J. Dixon

    Assistant Professor
    University of Mississippi

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Laura Dixon

    Elizabeth J. Kiel

    Associate Professor
    Miami University

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Elizabeth Kiel

    Andres G. Viana

    Assistant Professor
    University of Houston

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Andres Viana

    Kim L. Gratz

    Professor and Chair
    University of Toledo

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Kim Gratz


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