Category: Addictive Behaviors

Symposium

Symposium 24 - Novel Interventions for Smoking Cessation

Friday, November 17
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Location: Indigo Ballroom E, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: Smoking | Treatment Development
Presentation Type: Symposium

Following the release of the Surgeon General’s report publicizing the negative health consequences of cigarette smoking, smoking prevalence rates dropped substantially from 42% in 1965 to approximately 21% in 2004. However, despite increased efforts to reduce smoking prevalence, this rate of decline appears to have stalled in recent years. One possible explanation for this trend, the “hardening” hypothesis”, posits that smokers who could easily quit have already done so, and the remaining population of smokers consists primarily of individuals burdened with certain characteristics (e.g., psychiatric and medical comorbidities, greater nicotine dependence, poor social support) that are associated with greater difficulties in quitting smoking (Hughes, 2011). Current trends in smoking cessation outcomes seem to support this hypothesis. Although half of all smokers report a desire to quit smoking, 95-97% of those who attempt to quit smoking without treatment relapse within 6-12 months (Hughes et al., 2004), and 77% of participants in smoking cessation programs relapse within the first month (Branstrom et al., 2010). These findings indicate that traditional approaches to smoking cessation are unlikely to be effective for the current population of smokers and that innovative approaches that attempt to target those characteristics that may hinder smoking cessation efforts are necessary.

Therefore, the aim of the current symposium is to present findings from studies examining the efficacy of four newly developed smoking cessation interventions aimed at improving smoking cessation outcomes in this difficult-to-treat population. In the first presentation, McLeish and colleagues will present a pilot test of a couples-based intervention that integrates standard smoking cessation treatment with empirically-based couple relationship education strategies to improve social support processes. Then, Luberto and colleagues will present on a telephone-delivered, individually-tailored smoking cessation treatment targeting patients undergoing lung screening. The final two presentations will focus on a well-established risk factor for poor cessation outcomes, anxiety sensitivity. First, Smits and colleagues will examine whether the addition of exercise to standard smoking cessation treatment can improve smoking cessation outcomes among individuals high in anxiety sensitivity. Then, Garey and colleagues will examine the efficacy of an integrated smoking cessation and anxiety sensitivity reduction intervention for smokers high in anxiety sensitivity. Finally, Dr. Adam Gonzalez, an expert in smoking, anxiety, and treatment development, will serve as discussant to tie the presentations together and highlight avenues for future work in this area.

Learning Objectives:

Alison C. McLeish

Associate Professor
University of Louisville

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Alison McLeish

Adrienne L. Johnson

Graduate Student
University of Cincinatti

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Adrienne Johnson

Adam Gonzalez

Assistant Professor
Stony Brook University

Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Adam Gonzalez

    Alison C. McLeish

    Associate Professor
    University of Louisville

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Alison McLeish

    Christina M. Luberto

    Postdoctoral Fellow
    Massachusetts General Hospital

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Christina Luberto

    Jasper A. J. Smits

    Professor
    University of Texas at Austin

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Jasper Smits

    Lorra Garey

    Graduate Student
    University of Houston

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Lorra Garey


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