Category: Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders

Symposium

Symposium 43 - OCD in Diverse Contexts: Culture, Race, and Religion

Friday, November 17
1:45 PM - 3:15 PM
Location: Sapphire Ballroom I & J, Level 4, Sapphire Level

Keywords: OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) | Cultural Diversity/ Vulnerable Populations | Race / Ethnicity
Presentation Type: Symposium

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a complex and heterogeneous condition with diverse phenomenological features. Research evidence and clinical experience demonstrate the effects that one’s culture, racial identity, and religion have on the presentation of obsessions and compulsive rituals. For example, individuals with OCD who are devoutly religious often have obsessions and compulsions that focus on the doctrine and customs of their particular religion, and dysfunction is understood within the context of cultural norms. Moreover, such cultural factors must be taken into account when assessing, conceptualizing, and applying cognitive-behavioral treatment strategies among individuals with OCD. In concert with this year’s ABCT convention theme of “Applying CBT in Diverse Contexts,” this symposium will feature five papers that explore the impact of race, religion, and culture on obsessive-compulsive symptoms.


Speakers include both junior and senior researchers, who will present as follows: First, Dr. Monnica Williams will present findings suggesting that racial discrimination is related to obsessions and compulsions among African American adults. Dr. Neblett will then discuss the impact of racial identity and discrimination on the development and maintenance of OC symptoms for African American young adults. Drs. Clark and Inozu will next present cultural differences in the prevalence and symptom expression of OCD in Turkey and Canada. Jennifer Buchholz will then present on the relationship between religious affiliation and scrupulosity, a common presentation of OCD related to fear of God and sin. Finally, Dr. Jed Siev will present data suggesting that scrupulous obsessions and rituals are influenced by cognitive processes involved in moral judgements. As our discussant, Dr. Martin Franklin will synthesize the conclusions of these papers and offer his thoughts about current and future directions.

Learning Objectives:

Jonathan S. Abramowitz

Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Presentation(s):

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Martin Franklin

Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry
University of Pennsylvania

Presentation(s):

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Terence Ching

University of Connecticut

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Terence Ching

Enrique Neblett

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Enrique Neblett

David A. Clark

Professor Emeritus
University of New Brunswick

Presentation(s):

Send Email for David Clark

Jennifer Buchholz

Graduate Student
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Jennifer Buchholz

Send Email for Jed Siev


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