Category: Adult Anxiety - Social

Symposium

Symposium 19 - Refining Our Understanding of Cognitive Biases in Social Anxiety: New Insights Based on Diverse Methodologies

Friday, November 17
10:15 AM - 11:45 AM
Location: Sapphire Ballroom M & N, Level 4, Sapphire Level

Keywords: Cognitive Processes | Cognitive Biases / Distortions | Social Anxiety
Presentation Type: Symposium

Influential CBT models of social anxiety have highlighted the central importance of cognitive and information processing biases in the persistence of interfering symptoms (Clark & Wells, 1995; Hofmann, 2009; Rapee & Heimberg, 1997). Psychological research spanning several decades has attempted to illuminate such biases and, in turn, identify appropriate targets for psychological intervention (Steinman et al., 2015). The vast proliferation of this literature has resulted in unexpected challenges for scientist-practitioners hoping to draw clear conclusions from the field’s accumulated knowledge on the nature of these biases and on associated directions for treating patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD). This symposium aims to update and refine our understanding of cognitive biases in social anxiety by highlighting contemporary and innovative approaches to the study of these phenomena based on diverse methods, measures, and experimental contexts. Guided by an applied clinical lens, the present symposium will feature novel research by established experts in cognitive-behavioural models of social anxiety. First, Dr. Tom Rodebaugh from Washington University in St. Louis will present findings from three studies in which the vigilance-avoidance hypothesis of anxiety was re-examined using a novel experimental paradigm that helps to highlight key methodological and conceptual issues related to the dynamics of attentional biases in social anxiety. Next, in collaboration with his graduate supervisor, Dr. Lynn Alden, at the University of British Columbia, Klint Fung will present exciting new data that illuminates our understanding of fear acquisition and generalization biases in social anxiety based on both implicit and explicit measures. Dr. Joanna Arch from the University of Colorado Boulder will then present results of an innovative approach to studying daily cognitions based on ecological momentary assessments, which yielded intriguing conclusions about the potential importance of mind-wandering in SAD. Finally, Dr. David Moscovitch from the University of Waterloo will present new data from a recently validated semi-structured interview designed to assess the properties of mental imagery and autobiographical memory in social anxiety. Dr. Moscovitch’s findings indicate that individuals with SAD exhibit unique biases in both subjective appraisals and narrative details for imagined and remembered social failures, with important implications for interventions that target negative autobiographical memories in SAD. Dr. Bethany Teachman from the University of Virginia, an established international expert on cognitive biases in social anxiety, will served as our esteemed discussant.

Learning Objectives:

David A. Moscovitch

Professor of Psychology
University of Waterloo

Presentation(s):

Send Email for David Moscovitch

Send Email for Bethany Teachman

Thomas L. Rodebaugh

Associate Professor
Washington University

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Thomas Rodebaugh

Klint Fung

Graduate student
University of British Columbia

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Klint Fung

Joanna Arch

Assistant Professor
The University of Colorado at Boulder

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Joanna Arch

David A. Moscovitch

Professor of Psychology
University of Waterloo

Presentation(s):

Send Email for David Moscovitch


Assets

Symposium 19 - Refining Our Understanding of Cognitive Biases in Social Anxiety: New Insights Based on Diverse Methodologies



Attendees who have favorited this

Please enter your access key

The asset you are trying to access is locked. Please enter your access key to unlock.

Send Email for Refining Our Understanding of Cognitive Biases in Social Anxiety: New Insights Based on Diverse Methodologies