Category: Transdiagnostic

Symposium

Symposium 54 - The Forgotten Psychologies: Understanding and Treating Perfectionism, Procrastination, and Self-Criticism

Friday, November 17
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Location: Sapphire Ballroom A, Level 4, Sapphire Level

Keywords: Transdiagnostic | CBT | Randomized Controlled Trial
Presentation Type: Symposium

A number of patients experience difficulties that are not considered psychiatric disorders but still result in mental distress and decreased well-being. Conditions such as perfectionism, procrastination, and self-criticism can be severely debilitating and affect most areas of life, yet little attention has been given to the processes that maintain these problems nor the interventions that could be beneficial. Furthermore, perfectionism, procrastination, and self-criticism can also be seen as transdiagnostic issues that exacerbate or lead to psychiatric disorders, for instance, generalized anxiety disorder, eating disorders, and major depressive disorder (Shafran & Mansell, 2001; Rozental & Carlbring, 2014; Dunkley, Sanislow, Grilo, & McGlashan, 2009). Hence, finding efficient interventions for these problems may not only be helpful for those patients that are directly affected, but also contribute to better treatments for psychiatric disorders overall.


 


Up until recently, perfectionism, procrastination, and self-criticism have mainly been explored from the perspective of personality traits, while less research has been conducted within clinical psychology. However, more and more studies indicate that a cognitive-behavioral conceptualization can be important in order to determine maintaining factors and the types of interventions that might be useful (Egan & Hine, 2008; Rozental, Forsell, Svensson, Andersson, & Carlbring, 2015; Dunkley, Mandel, & Ma, 2014). Maladaptive beliefs, cognitive biases, emotional regulation, and schedules of reinforcement have all been shown to be important in understanding the underlying mechanisms behind perfectionism, procrastination, and self-criticism (Egan, Wade, & Shafran, 2011; Rozental & Carlbring, 2014; Dunkley et al., 2016). This knowledge has also helped to develop interventions that specifically target the factors that seem to maintain these problems.


 


The current symposium aims to provide the latest advances in the field of these forgotten yet prevalent psychologies. Findings from both basic and applied research in clinical psychology will be presented and discussed. Both predictive and moderating mechanisms behind perfectionism, procrastination, and self-criticism will be outlined, together with empirical data on the results of interventions for these problems that stem from randomized controlled trials in different settings, countries, and patient populations.

Learning Objectives:

Maureen L. Whittal

Vancouver CBT Centre/University of British Columbia

Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Maureen Whittal

    Adam S. Radomsky

    Professor and Research Chair in Anxiety and Related Disorders
    Concordia University

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Adam Radomsky

    David Dunkley

    Associate Professor
    Lady Davis Institute - Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Canada, McGill University

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for David Dunkley

    Per Carlbring

    Professor
    Stockholm University

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Per Carlbring

    Alexander Rozental

    PhD
    Stockholm University

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Alexander Rozental


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