Category: Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders

Symposium

Symposium 44 - Am I at Risk? Factors Predicting the Development and Maintenance of Obsessive-Compulsive-Related Disorders

Friday, November 17
1:45 PM - 3:15 PM
Location: Sapphire Ballroom K & L, Level 4, Sapphire Level

Keywords: Body Dysmorphic Disorder | OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) | Risk / Vulnerability Factors
Presentation Type: Symposium

Understanding risk and maintenance factors for mental illnesses is essential for developing effective, targeted prevention and treatment programs. Moreover, in line with the theme of this year’s conference, an accurate understanding of risk and maintenance factors provides a key tool for adapting CBT to patients across diverse symptom presentations and contexts. To date, a small amount of research has examined risk and maintenance factors in obsessive compulsive related disorders (OCRDs), but additional investigation is clearly needed to provide robust empirical support for current cognitive behavioral models of development and maintenance. The present symposium aims to address this gap in the literature. Each talk presents data on risk or maintaining factors for OCRDs, using diverse research approaches across the five studies.


 First, Dr. Angela Fang will present behavioral data on social-cognitive processing biases in patients with BDD compared to healthy controls (HCs), pointing to factors that may exacerbate and maintain symptoms. Second, Dr. Hilary Weingarden will present patient-centered data on life events that individuals with BDD report served as initial triggers of their appearance concerns. Dr. Weingarden will relate these data to current diathesis-stress models of BDD development and discuss how this patient-centered design complements and extends the existing hypothesis-driven research on risk factors for BDD. Third, Dr. Noah Berman will present behavioral and self-report data examining parental risk factors for transmission of obsessive compulsive (OC) beliefs to one’s children. Dr. Berman will discuss implications for these findings in terms of creating individualized prevention programs for OCD. Fourth, Berta Summers will present experimental data that examines the effect of manipulating appearance-related safety behaviors (e.g., mirror checking, grooming) on subsequent BDD symptoms and cognitions. She will discuss implications for the role of safety behaviors as risk and maintaining factors within the CBT model of BDD.  Finally, Dr. Sabine Wilhelm will present longitudinal data on cognitive mechanisms and maintaining factors in CBT treatment for 45 patients with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD).


 Dr. Gail Steketee will synthesize findings across talks, highlighting how this research advances our cognitive behavioral models of OCRDs. Dr. Steketee will discuss ways in which new data about risk and maintenance factors can be used to apply CBT across diverse patient presentations and contexts. 

Learning Objectives:

Hilary Weingarden

Clinical research fellow
Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Hilary Weingarden

Send Email for Gail Steketee

Angela Fang

Assistant in Psychology, Instructor in Psychiatry
Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Angela Fang

Hilary Weingarden

Clinical research fellow
Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Hilary Weingarden

Noah C. Berman

Assistant Professor
Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Noah Berman

Berta Summers

Graduate Student
Florida State University

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Berta Summers

Send Email for Sabine Wilhelm


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