Category: Health Care System / Public Policy

Symposium

Symposium 63 - Aftercare Engagement Across Diverse Contexts: Identifying Vulnerable Consumers and Effective Intervention

Saturday, November 18
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Location: Indigo Ballroom B, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: Health Care System | Cultural Diversity/ Vulnerable Populations | Treatment-Other
Presentation Type: Symposium

     Research on access to mental health treatment has consistently demonstrated that utilization of specialty services is low, particularly among individuals from low-income and racial/ethnic minority groups. This research has also highlighted the inherent challenges of engaging vulnerable consumer populations, such as veterans, and individuals with substance use disorders or serious mental illness. While this research has advanced our knowledge of general access to outpatient care, less is known about aftercare engagement: the transition to outpatient services following psychiatric hospitalization.    
     The limited research that has been conducted on aftercare engagement underscores the significant public health effects of failure to engage with these services, including rehospitalization and increased risk of suicide. This research has generally focused on identifying predictors of aftercare engagement among adult consumers, with increased engagement noted among those who are female, White, and insured. Although research has aided in identifying underserved populations, low rates of engagement persist.
     There are several gaps in the existing literature that offer promising avenues for further research. For example, as prior research has relied mostly on retrospective chart reviews, we lack information on how psychological processes underlie this transition. Cultivating an understanding for how variables such as illness beliefs or treatment attitudes inform aftercare would best inform clinical intervention. We have also yet to examine unique predictors of aftercare engagement among youth, who may be accessing services for the first time. Lastly, while the literature has identified systems-level bridging techniques, their application to consumers reluctant to seek formal psychiatric care merits exploration.
     This symposium brings together a collection of studies addressing aftercare engagement across diverse consumer populations and clinical contexts. The first paper examines predictors of 30-day rehospitalization among individuals with major depressive disorder. The second paper will focus on racial/ethnic disparities in aftercare engagement among youth. The third paper explores the role of several psychological variables, including illness perception, in informing aftercare intention. The final paper will present data on a novel intervention aimed to facilitate aftercare engagement among veterans. The discussant will identify commonalities among the four presentations and suggest recommendations for future research and clinical work.

Learning Objectives:

Kristen C. Keefe

Clark University

Presentation(s):

Send Email for Kristen Keefe

Ivan Miller

Professor
Brown University & Butler Hospital

Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Ivan Miller

    Lauren M. Weinstock

    Associate Professor (Research)
    Brown University & Butler Hospital

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Lauren Weinstock

    Timothy B. Creedon

    Brandeis University

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Timothy Creedon

    Kristen C. Keefe

    Clark University

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Kristen Keefe

    Jennifer M. Primack

    Brown University & Providence VA Medical Center

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Jennifer M. Primack


    Assets

    Symposium 63 - Aftercare Engagement Across Diverse Contexts: Identifying Vulnerable Consumers and Effective Intervention



    Attendees who have favorited this

    Please enter your access key

    The asset you are trying to access is locked. Please enter your access key to unlock.

    Send Email for Aftercare Engagement Across Diverse Contexts: Identifying Vulnerable Consumers and Effective Intervention