Category: Eating Disorders

Symposium

Symposium 68 - Adapting Exposure Therapy to Address Disordered Eating and Body Dissatisfaction in Diverse Populations

Saturday, November 18
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Location: Cobalt 501, Level 5, Cobalt Level

Keywords: Exposure | Eating Disorders | Body Image
Presentation Type: Symposium

Exposure therapy, including exposure and response prevention (ERP), is one of the most supported treatments for anxiety disorders.  Given evidence that anxiety is a prominent feature of many eating disorder symptoms, exposure therapy appears to be a logical treatment choice for eating disorders.  Although research evaluating exposure therapy for bulimia nervosa dates back to the early 1980s, only more recently have scientist-practitioners started to explore the efficacy of therapist-assisted exposure for other eating disorder diagnoses and symptoms.  Exposure therapy may have utility for a diversity of populations and issues related to disordered eating and body dissatisfaction, ranging from children with avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID) to adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN) to overweight adult women with poor body image.  While certain core features of exposure therapy will likely remain consistent across these various applications, specific features of these diverse clinical presentations also warrant important adaptations.  This symposium will present results from five research projects that each adapted exposure therapy for a distinct population and treatment setting, including: (1) adolescents with AN undergoing weight restoration in a partial hospital program; (2) weight-restored adults receiving inpatient treatment for AN; (3) children with ARFID participating in treatment at a partial hospital program; (4) treatment-seeking young adults with clinical and subclinical levels of binge eating; and (5) normal weight, overweight, and obese adult women with body dissatisfaction receiving a brief session of mirror exposure.  In addition to discussing the efficacy of different exposure-related interventions, this symposium will highlight a number of issues related to the application of exposure therapy to these populations and settings.  Topics include the potential risks of providing food exposure during the weight restoration phase of AN, how to individualize exposure therapy when treating the heterogeneous clinical population of ARFID, considering possible limitations and avenues for improvement of past ERP investigations, identifying who benefits most from exposure therapy aimed at improving body image, and determining how to maximize the beneficial effects of mirror exposure.  

Learning Objectives:

Jamal H. Essayli

Postdoctoral Fellow
Pennsylvania State University Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

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Drew A. Anderson

Associate Professor
University at Albany, SUNY

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    Jamal H. Essayli

    Postdoctoral Fellow
    Pennsylvania State University Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Jamal Essayli

    Deborah R. Glasofer

    Assistant Professor
    Columbia University Medical Center

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    Susan E. Lane-Loney

    Assistant Professor
    Pennsylvania State University Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

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    Lisa M. Anderson

    Postdoctoral Fellow
    University of Minnesota; University at Albany, SUNY

    Presentation(s):

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    Glenn Waller

    Professor
    The University of Sheffield

    Presentation(s):

    Send Email for Glenn Waller


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