Category: Child / Adolescent - Anxiety

Symposium

School-Based Prevention and Early Intervention for Anxiety: A Randomized Control Trial With Hispanic/Latino Youth

Friday, November 17
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Location: Sapphire 410, Level 4, Sapphire Level

Keywords: Child Anxiety | Hispanic Americans | Cross Cultural / Cultural Differences
Presentation Type: Symposium

Research indicates that Hispanic/Latino (H/L) youth experience a significant mental health disparity, are at greater risk for anxiety, but have lower levels of treatment seeking behaviors and higher levels of drop out. Further, despite population estimates of over 18 million, H/L youth have been underrepresented in efficacy and effectiveness trials. In fact, the anxiety intervention literature is limited to two randomized control trials that include a sample of majority H/L youth (Silverman et al., 2009; Pina et al., 2012) limiting knowledge relevant to the benefit of anxiety treatments with H/L youth. In this presentation, we will share an overview of a new 6-session (20-30 min) exposure-based cognitive and behavior with social skills training intervention (ECBI) intended to benefit H/L youth. We will report findings from a hybrid-1 effectiveness-implementation trial conducted in the schools with 59 H/L, 39 Caucasian (CA), and 11 other (e.g., mixed ethnicity) youth. Participants met the cutoff for high anxiety levels on the SCAS and were randomized to ECBI or active control. Results showed that implementation quality was high and predicted treatment response at posttest in terms of emotional awareness and expressivity, cognitive interpretation biases, and self-efficacy for managing anxiety-provoking situations. At follow-up, significant treatment effects on cognitive interpretation biases, self-efficacy for managing anxiety-provoking situations, and social competence were found. There also were statistically significant reductions in autonomic arousal and anxiety symptoms for youth whose anxiety was more severe at baseline. In terms of clinically significant change, ECBI youth had fewer progressive anxiety escalations and more returns to the normal range compared to control. No moderation of program effects by ethnicity (CA vs H/L) were found. Our discussion will focus on reasons the ECBI might be culturally robust (i.e., design principles and implementation dimensions targeted) as well as hypothesized reasons why the ECBI might fail for some H/L youth.

Lindsay E. Holly

Postdoctoral Associate
Boston University

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School-Based Prevention and Early Intervention for Anxiety: A Randomized Control Trial With Hispanic/Latino Youth



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