Category: Treatment - Other

Symposium

Evaluating Personalized Feedback Intervention Framing to Reduce Young Adult Alcohol-Related Sexual Risk Taking

Saturday, November 18
10:15 AM - 11:45 AM
Location: Cobalt 502, Level 5, Cobalt Level

Keywords: Addictive Behaviors | Prevention | Alcohol
Presentation Type: Symposium

The present study evaluated the efficacy of two personalized feedback interventions (PFIs) with alcohol and sexual risk taking content that was either combined (i.e., alcohol and sexual risk content presented individually) or integrated (i.e., the role of alcohol integrated into sexual risk taking content). Intervention effects on reducing sexual risk taking (i.e., number of casual sexual partners, number of times using a condom) and alcohol-related risky sexual behavior (RSB) (i.e., alcohol-related sex consequences, number of sexual partners involving alcohol), relative to the control group, were examined as primary outcomes. In a randomized controlled trial, 402 (53.98% female) sexually active young adults aged 18-25 were randomly assigned to a combined alcohol and alcohol-related RSB intervention, an integrated alcohol and alcohol-related RSB intervention, or attention control. All assessment and intervention procedures were web-based. At the one-month follow-up, results indicated that those randomly assigned to the integrated condition had a statistically significant lower likelihood of having any casual sex partners compared to those in the control group. At the six-month follow-up, the combined condition had a statistically significant lower likelihood of having any casual sex partners compared to the control group. There were no significant intervention effects on condom use. When examining alcohol-related RSB, at the one-month follow-up, both the combined and integrated conditions showed a lower likelihood of any alcohol consumption prior to sex compared to the control group. When examining alcohol-related sexual consequences, results showed a statistically significant reduction in the non-zero count of consequences in the integrated condition compared to the control at the one-month follow-up. Overall, the integrated PFI demonstrated more reductions than the combined PFI in short-term intervention outcomes, including negative consequences, compared to control. The findings highlight the utility of a brief, web-based integrated alcohol and RSB intervention that can be delivered via the Internet to reach national samples of at-risk young adults.

Melissa Lewis

Associate Professor
University of Washington

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Evaluating Personalized Feedback Intervention Framing to Reduce Young Adult Alcohol-Related Sexual Risk Taking



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