Category: Addictive Behaviors

Symposium

Effects of Anxiety Sensitivity Risk Reduction Treatment on Smoking Outcomes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Friday, November 17
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Location: Indigo Ballroom E, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: Smoking | Anxiety Sensitivity | Treatment Development
Presentation Type: Symposium

Robust scientific evidence indicates anxiety sensitivity (AS) as a risk factor for poor smoking cessation outcomes. Integrated smoking cessation programs that target AS may lead to improved smoking cessation outcomes, potentially through reductions in AS. Yet, little work has evaluated the efficacy of integrated smoking cessation interventions on abstinence or other smoking outcomes. The present study prospectively examined treatment effects of a novel AS reduction-smoking cessation intervention relative to a standard smoking cessation intervention on smoking cessation outcomes. Participants (N = 526) included current smokers randomized to receive either (1) 4-session state-of-the-art smoking cessation intervention (Smoking Treatment and Anxiety Program; [STAMP]) or (2) 4-session standard-of-care smoking cessation intervention. The primary hypotheses focused on examining the effects of a STAMP on (1) AS reduction during the course of treatment, (2) smoking cessation outcomes post-quit, including abstinence, urges, and withdrawal, and (3) the mechanistic function of AS reduction on treatment effects across smoking outcomes. Results indicated a significant reduction in AS across both treatments (slope = -.71, p < .001), with a significantly greater decline in AS scores in the STAMP condition (B = -.72, p < .001). Treatment did not significantly predict early abstinence, urges, or withdrawal; however, both treatment groups exhibited a significant linear reduction in urges (slope = -3.03, p < .01). Treatment did not significantly predict late abstinence, urges, or withdrawal. Both treatment groups exhibited a significant linear reduction in withdrawal during the late assessment phase (slope = -.06, p < .01). Lastly, the impact of treatment on early abstinence was significant mediated by reductions in AS (indirect = .16, 95% CI [.02, .40]). Findings provide evidence for the efficacy of a novel, integrated smoking cessation treatment to reduce AS. Moreover, the meditation pathway from treatment to early abstinence through reductions in AS suggest that AS is a clinically importance mechanism of change relevant to smoking cessation treatment and research.

Lorra Garey

Graduate Student
University of Houston

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Effects of Anxiety Sensitivity Risk Reduction Treatment on Smoking Outcomes: A Randomized Controlled Trial



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