Category: Suicide and Self-Injury

Symposium

Developing Implementation Strategies With Stakeholders to Promote Firearm Safety as a Suicide Prevention Strategy in Pediatric Primary Care

Friday, November 17
1:45 PM - 3:15 PM
Location: Cobalt 502, Level 5, Cobalt Level

Keywords: Suicide | Implementation | Community-Based Assessment / Intervention
Presentation Type: Symposium

Promoting safe firearm practices, or firearms means restriction, is a promising but infrequently used suicide prevention strategy. Safety Check is an evidence-based practice for improving parental firearm safety behavior in pediatric primary care. Providers rarely discuss firearm safety, suggesting the need to better understand barriers and facilitators to promoting this approach. This study, Adolescent Suicide Prevention In Routine clinical Encounters (ASPIRE), aims to engender a better understanding of how to implement components of Safety Check as a suicide prevention strategy in pediatric primary care from a system-level perspective.


 


Methods: We are collaboratively developing implementation strategies in partnership with stakeholders from two sites in the NIMH-funded Mental Health Research Network. We surveyed providers and leadership of 82 pediatric primary care practices to understand acceptability and use of the three firearm components of Safety Check (i.e., screening, brief counseling on firearm safety, provision of firearm locks). In collaboration with stakeholders, we are using intervention mapping and the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research to systematically develop and evaluate a multi-level menu of implementation strategies for promoting firearm safety as a suicide prevention strategy in pediatric primary care.


 


Results: Physician leaders (n=40) endorsed that the Safety Check is acceptable from their perspective, but that it would not be acceptable to doctors. Primary care physicians (n = 100) endorsed that the Safety Check is acceptable from their perspective, but that it would not be acceptable to patients and parents. All respondents reported components of the Safety Check are rarely used. Qualitative interviews with nine stakeholder groups are ongoing.


 


Conclusion: This study will provide important insights into acceptability and current use of evidence-based practices for safe firearm practices in pediatric primary care for suicide prevention. We will also outline our approach to collaboratively developing implementation strategies with stakeholders across two large systems using a systematic and mixed-methods approach. 

Rinad Beidas

Assistant Professor
University of Pennsylvania

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