Category: Addictive Behaviors

Symposium

An Individually Tailored Smoking Cessation Intervention Delivered via Telephone for Lung Screening Patients

Friday, November 17
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Location: Indigo Ballroom E, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: Smoking | Treatment Development | Behavioral Medicine
Presentation Type: Symposium

Lung cancer screening has recently been endorsed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the U.S. Preventative Service Task Force, leading to a greater adoption of lung screening procedures. Approximately half of lung screening patients are current smokers and smoking cessation counseling is recommended during the lung screening process. Interventions should use evidence-based approaches and address perceived and actual risk of lung cancer and smoking-related diseases. Capturing patients in person is challenging because they may be seen across diverse locations, suggesting a need for a telehealth approach.


At a large academic medical center, we developed a 4-session telephone-based smoking cessation intervention for lung screening patients based on motivational interviewing and the 5 A’s (ask, advise, assess, assist, arrange). The first session was tailored to each patient using a computer algorithm to generate a personalized counseling script, based on responses to a baseline survey of smoking and medical history and risk perceptions. We tested the acceptability and preliminary effects of this intervention on cognitive-affective targets and smoking behaviors in an open pilot trial. Participants (N=44; Mage=61.84, SD=7.14; 63% male) completed the survey at baseline and 12-week follow-up (N=35). Participants were long-term smokers (M=46.20 years, SD=7.41) and most (64%) were not motivated to quit at baseline. During the intervention, 23% made a quit attempt and 29% decreased their smoking. At follow-up, 9% remained quit. Of those who completed all four counseling calls (N=25), there was a significant increase in confidence to quit (pp2=.24) and a trend toward increased importance to quit (p=.09, ηp2=.10). There was also a trend toward decreased personal disease risk (p=.10; d=.31) and increased comparative disease risk (p=.09; d=.37). Participants reported satisfaction with the intervention and requested more sessions. Overall, this novel smoking cessation intervention was acceptable and associated with improvements in smoking-related thoughts and behaviors, though interventions of a greater dose are needed to promote long-term quitting. 

Christina M. Luberto

Postdoctoral Fellow
Massachusetts General Hospital

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