Category: Schizophrenia / Psychotic Disorders

Symposium

Comparing a Narrative and Educational Film to Increase Knowledge and Interpersonal Communication About Psychosis

Friday, November 17
1:45 PM - 3:15 PM
Location: Indigo Ballroom E, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: Community-Based Assessment / Intervention | Psychosis / Psychotic Disorders | Hispanic Americans
Presentation Type: Symposium

Background: The present study assessed the content and focus of dialogues following the presentation of two video formats –an educational and a narrative video– both developed to increase knowledge about psychosis and early professional help-seeking among Spanish-speaking Latinos, a community at risk for prolonged duration of untreated psychosis (DUP).


Method: A total of 98 Spanish-speaking Latino adults (M = 41 years old) were recruited from a community center in Los Angeles.  The Spanish language videos were developed for a community campaign to reduce the DUP.  The participants were randomly assigned to an educational format, in which a mental health professional presented psychotic symptoms, or a brief narrative film format about a family that at first did not recognize the symptoms in a relative, and then, with the help of a neighbor, sought professional help. Following the showing of the videos, focus groups were conducted and the discussions were audio recorded and transcribed.  The authors identified key themes based on the dialogue that emerged. 


Results: Common themes across both video formats included the value of identifying symptoms of psychosis early on, the importance of finding professional help for those with psychosis, and the preponderance of stigma against persons with mental illness. Different emphasis and themes were also observed between the two formats.  Individuals who viewed the educational video focused more on the causes of symptom, including social stressors and street drugs. Those who watched the narrative film attended more to how best to help individuals with psychosis, particularly through family support.


Conclusion: The content of both videos stimulated considerable dialogue about psychosis and were judged to be useful.  Knowing that one format generates more of a discussion about symptoms and the other fosters more of a discussion about the role of family support can be considered in their application.

Diana Gamez

University of Southern California

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Comparing a Narrative and Educational Film to Increase Knowledge and Interpersonal Communication About Psychosis



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