Category: Child / Adolescent - Depression

PS2- #C95 - Parent Depression and Youth Self-Esteem: The Moderating Role of Parenting in a Sample of High-Risk Youth

Friday, Nov 17
9:45 AM – 10:45 AM
Location: Indigo Ballroom CDGH, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: Depression | Parenting | Adolescents

Offspring of depressed parents are at a 3-fold risk of developing MDD, as compared to offspring for whom neither parent is depressed (Weissman, Warner, Wickramaratne, Moreau, & Olfson, 1997). According to Garber and Martin (2002), parental depression, altered parenting, and low self-esteem are key predictors of depression in adolescents. The current study examined dimensions of parenting (i.e., parental psychological control, acceptance) as potential moderators of the relation between parent depression and adolescent self-esteem in a sample of high-risk youth.


Participants (N = 316, 13-17 years old; M = 14.79, SD = 1.35) were part of a larger prevention trial conducted across four sites within the U.S. (Garber et al., 2009). Enrolled youth (58.5% female; 24.7% ethnic/racial minority) were offspring of parents with current or prior depressive disorders. They were randomized into one of 2 conditions: a 14-session group cognitive-behavioral preventive intervention or usual care.


Parents and youth completed assessments at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and at a 20-month follow-up. Parent depression was assessed with the Center for Epidemiological Studies - Depression (CES-D; Radloff, 1977). Parenting style (i.e., psychological control and acceptance) was assessed using child-report on a shortened version of the Children’s Reports of Parental Behavior Inventory (CRPBI; Schaefer, 1965). Self-esteem was assessed using youth self-report on the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES; Rosenberg, 1965). 


A series of hierarchical regression analyses examined the predictive value of parent depression and parenting style on adolescent self-esteem, both the main effects and interactions. Results revealed that parental psychological control interacted with parent depression to significantly predict adolescent self-esteem (β =.214, p = .017). Additional analyses examined the impact of the intervention in the association between parent depression and parental psychological control. Intervention moderated the relation of parent depression and parenting style to predict adolescent self-esteem at post-treatment (β = .213, p = .013), and at the 20-month follow-up (β =.306, p = .004).


Overall, findings highlight the importance of considering parental factors in longitudinal patterns of self-esteem across childhood and adolescence. We also will examine sociodemographic characteristics (e.g., sex, race/ethnicity, age, parent education) and further compare group differences in intervention response. Findings may help identify parenting strategies that could foster adolescent self-esteem, especially in youth at-risk for depression. 

Angela W. Wang

Research Coordinator
San Diego State University
San Diego, California

Argero Zerr

San Diego State University

Karen T. G.. Schwartz

Doctoral Student
San Diego State University/University of California, San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology

V. Robin Weersing

Professor
San Diego State University
San Diego, California

David A. Brent

University of Pittsburgh and Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic

Greg Clarke

Senior Investigator
Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research

William R. Beardslee

Boston Children’s Hospital

Tracy Gladstone

Professor
Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College
Wellesley, Massachusetts

Steven D. Hollon

Professor of Psychology and Human Development
Vanderbilt University
Nashville, Tennessee

Frances Lynch

Senior Investigator
Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research

Giovanna Porta

Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic

Judy Garber

Professor
Vanderbilt University
Nashville, Tennessee