Category: Child / Adolescent - School-Related Issues

PS10- #B62 - Impact of Adolescent Routines and Personal Adjustment on Learning Problems

Saturday, Nov 18
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Location: Indigo Ballroom CDGH, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: Adolescents | School

Routines are defined as reoccurring practices that often surround aspects of daily living (Bagatell, 2016). Family routines often include morning, homework, meal time, and evening routines. Routines are associated with positive outcomes in youth such as higher grades and academic achievement test scores and often reduce procrastination(Roche & Gharzarian, 2012; Taylor, 2015; Hofer &Fries, 2007). Family routines may buffer the impact of family conflict and community violence (David, Leblanc, & Self-Brown, 2015). Routines create constancy and predictability in families and are linked to children’s well-being (Wildender, Lee McIntyre, Fiese and Eckert, 2008). Relative to the examination of children’s routines, the impact of routines in adolescents is much less understood. Nonetheless, existing research supports the importance of routines to adolescents’ psychological adjustment and academic performance. For example, Roche and Ghazarian (2012), found that more family routines were associated with higher achievement in math grades in low income minority families. The current investigation addresses the paucity of studies examining the relationship between adolescent routines, learning problems and personal adjustment. After obtaining parent consent and adolescent assent, 226 adolescents and their caregivers completed measures that assessed family and personal routines (Adolescent Routines Questionnaire), personal adjustment (Behavioral Assessment System for Children, BASC-2 SRP 12-21, Personal Adjustment Composite; Reynolds & Kamphaus, 2006), and learning problems (Conners 3; Learning Problems subscale; Conners, 2008). The caregiver completed the routines questionnaire and the learning problems subscale and the adolescent completed the personal adjustment composite. The results indicated a significant, negative relationship between adolescent routines and learning problems, r =-.341, p < .05 and accounted for 11% of the variance (R2=.12, F(1,188) = 24.69, p < .05). Further, when the interaction term between adjustment and routines was included the model to assess personal adjustment as a moderator an additional 8% of the variance was accounted for (R2=.19, F(3,156) = 13.33, p < .05). Consistent with previous research, this study found that the presence of routines predicted fewer learning problems. Moreover, the results indicated that personal adjustment moderates the relationship between routines and learning problems. 

Adrienne I. Anderson

Graduate Student
Louisiana State University

Sabrina Gretkierewicz

Graduate Student
Louisiana State University

Jennifer Piscitello

Graduate Student
Louisiana State University

Ryan N. Cummins

Graduate Student
Louisiana State University
Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Mary Lou Kelley

Director of Clinical Training
Louisiana State University