Category: Health Psychology / Behavioral Medicine - Adult

PS5- #B46 - Exploring Acceptance and Mindfulness Among Latinos Living With HIV/AIDS

Friday, Nov 17
1:30 PM – 2:30 PM
Location: Indigo Ballroom CDGH, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: HIV / AIDS | Acceptance | Mindfulness

HIV/AIDS is an illness that poses several adaptive challenges. Latinos are disproportionally affected by HIV/AIDS.  Two major challenges for this population are satisfactory medication adherence and quality of life. Acceptance and mindfulness have been associated with greater reports of quality of life and medication adherence. To the researchers’ knowledge, this is the first study examining acceptance and mindfulness among Latinos with HIV/AIDS. A total of 48 participants completed questionnaires measuring acceptance, mindfulness, cognitive fusion, quality of life, and medication adherence. There were three main hypotheses: a) acceptance and mindfulness would be positively associated with medication adherence, b) acceptance and mindfulness would be positively associated with quality of life, and c) acceptance, mindfulness, and cognitive fusion would predict higher rates of quality of life and medication adherence. Bivariate correlations indicated that acceptance was positively associated with quality of life, but not with medication adherence. Mindfulness was associated with medication adherence, but not with quality of life. When acceptance, mindfulness, and cognitive fusion were entered into regression models, acceptance and mindfulness significantly predicted quality of life and mindfulness predicted both quality of life and medication adherence. Cognitive fusion did not predict quality of life or medication adherence. These results suggest that acceptance and mindfulness are strategies that are associated with better wellbeing and health outcomes. The present findings also suggest that Latinos with HIV could benefit from acceptance and mindfulness based interventions with the goal of promoting cognitive defusion, overall well-being and ameliorate the stress of living with this illness. 

Tatiana Rodriguez

Graduate Student
Bowling Green State Univesity
Monroe

William H. O'Brien

Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, Ohio