Category: ADHD - Child

PS6- #B34 - Emotion Dysregulation Linked to Peer Victimization Among Children With ADHD

Friday, Nov 17
2:45 PM – 3:45 PM
Location: Indigo Ballroom CDGH, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: ADHD - Child / Adolescent | Emotion Regulation | Social Relationships

Introduction: Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) often demonstrate greater emotion dysregulation and experience higher rates of peer victimization relative to unaffected peers. Although previous literature suggests emotion dysregulation is associated with peer victimization, this relation has yet to be explored among children with ADHD. Therefore, the current study sought to examine the extent to which emotion dysregulation is related to peer victimization in a sample of children diagnosed with ADHD.

Method:
One hundred thirty-six children with ADHD (9.0 ± 1.4 years) participated in the present study. Parents and children completed the Children’s Emotion Management Scale and the Perception of Peer Support Scale to assess emotion dysregulation and peer victimization. Bivariate correlations and hierarchical linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the relation between parent- and child-report of emotion dysregulation and peer victimization.

Results:  
Hierarchical regression analyses significantly supported the relation of emotion dysregulation to peer victimization for both parent- (F (4, 135) = 2.75, p = .03) and child-report (F (4, 131) = 3.67, p = .007) ratings of emotion dysregulation and peer victimization, such that greater emotion dysregulation in children with ADHD was associated with increased rates of peer victimization above and beyond the effects of age, sex, and ADHD medications.

Conclusion:
Using a multi-informant approach, the current study demonstrates that emotion dysregulation is linked to peer victimization among children with ADHD. The current findings are consistent with previous literature, and suggest the extent to which a child with ADHD is unable to regulate their emotions in the presence of peer threat substantially contributes to their risk for peer victimization. Implications, limitations, and future directions are discussed.

Nicholas D. Fogleman

Graduate Student
University of Louisville
Louisville, Kentucky

Kirsten Leaberry

Graduate Student
University of Louisville

Kelly E. Slaughter

Graduate Student
University of Louisville
Louisville, Kentucky

Danielle Walerius

Graduate Student
University of Louisville

Paul J. Rosen

Associate Professor of Psychology
University of Louisville