Category: ADHD - Child

PS3- #A19 - Effects of a Father-Focused Behavioral Parent Training Intervention on Father Behavior Management Skills: Generalization Across Tasks

Friday, Nov 17
11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Location: Indigo Ballroom CDGH, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: ADHD - Child / Adolescent | Parent Training | Externalizing

Background: Behavioral parent training in which important adults in the child’s life are the primary agents of child behavior change is a well-established intervention for ADHD (Evans, Owens & Bunford, 2014). However, longitudinal data suggests that children who receive such treatment remain substantially impaired during adolescence (e.g. Molina & Pelham, 2014). One potential under-utlized adult who may contribute to longer lasting ameliorative change is the father figure and the study of treatment engagement efforts for fathers is scarce (Fabiano, 2007). The current study investigated treatment generalization effects on parent behavior management skills of a father-focused behavioral parent training program based on empirically-supported Coaching Our Acting Out Children: Heightening Essential Skills (COACHES; Fabiano et al., 2009; Fabiano et al., 2012).


Study Design: All participating children (n = 7) were diagnosed with ADHD using gold-standard assessment practices (Pelham et al., 2005).This study was conducted as part of a feasibility and acceptability pilot trial of COACHES adapted for school settings. Children and fathers attended 8, weekly 90-minute sessions. Each week, fathers participated in 30-minute video-guided group parent training sessions while children worked on soccer skills. Subsequently, fathers joined their children on the soccer field and in-vivo practiced parenting skills during a soccer scrimmage. Direct behavioral observations were collected pre- and post-treatment using the Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System III (DPICS-III; Eyberg, et al., 2009) during 2 minute soccer and lego tasks during which fathers were instructed to use whatever strategy they thought would best help their child dribble a ball around cones, and build a lego house, respectively. Coders also coded number of cones completed, degree to which father was an effective coach, and both parent and child enjoyment.



Results:
Intra-class correlations were calculated using a one-way random effects model and indicated that coder reliability fell in the good range (ICC = .713; Cicchetti, 1994). Paired-sample t-tests showed no significant DPICS differences for each task, suggesting that the soccer-focused intervention did not effect father behavior within soccer tasks only. Within-subject trends showed significant correlational improvement in parent behavioral management skills and graphs showing individual improvements will be presented. 

Fiona L. Macphee

Doctoral Student
Florida International University
Coral Gables, Florida

Gregory A. Fabiano

Professor and Dean for InterInterdisciplinary Research
University of Buffalo
Buffalo, New York

Nicole Schatz

Assistant Professor
Florida International University

Amy Altszuler

Doctoral Student
Florida International University
Miami, Florida

Elizabeth Gnagy

Florida International University

Andrew Greiner

Florida International University

Erika K. Coles

Director
Center for Children and Families at Florida International University

Joseph Raiker

Assistant Professor
Florida International University
Miami, Florida

William E. Pelham

Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry
Florida International University
Miami, Florida