Category: Addictive Behaviors

PS15- #A19 - Cannabis Use Motives Predict Cannabis Use Disorder Risk in a Sample of Recent Cannabis Users

Sunday, Nov 19
9:00 AM – 10:00 AM
Location: Indigo Ballroom CDGH, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: Addictive Behaviors | DSM-5 | Risk / Vulnerability Factors

Previous research has demonstrated the utility of motivational models of cannabis use to predict cannabis use and the associated negative consequences (Simons et al., 1998). To date, few studies have examined the role of motives for cannabis use in predicting risk for cannabis use disorders (Moitra et al., 2015). The purpose of the current study was to examine cannabis use motives as predictors of three measures of cannabis use risk. Participants were 252 undergraduate students who reported cannabis use within the past 30 days via an anonymous survey. Participants completed the Marijuana Motives Questionnaire (MMQ), and measures of typical smoking behavior (Daily Smoking Questionnaire; DSQ) and risk: Cannabis Use Disorders Identification Test-R (CUDIT-R), Marijuana Problem Index (MPI), and DSM-5 Cannabis Use Disorder Criteria. Multiple linear regressions were conducted to assess whether cannabis motives aided in predicting total CUDIT-R scores, total DSM-5 criteria, and total MPI scores above frequency of cannabis use. For each regression, composite scores for frequency of cannabis use per week were entered in the first model, and the five motives subscales (Enhancement, Conformity, Coping, Expansion, and Social) were entered in the second model. Frequency of cannabis use per week predicted total CUDIT-R scores, b=.25, t(247)=9.8, pF(5, 241)=11.09, p Enhancement (b=.19, t[246]=2.72, pb=.26, t[246]=2.4, pb=.32, t[246]=3.2, pb=.08, t(247)=7.55, pF(5, 241)=12.5, p Enhancement (b=.06, t[247]=2.21, pb=.16, t[247]=4.0, pb = .26, t(246)=6.84, pF(5, 240)=23.3, p Enhancement (b=.23, t[246]=2.39, pb=.96, t[246]=6.45, pb=.61, t[246]=4.49, p < .001) subscales contributed to the model. Cannabis use motives, particularly Enhancement and Coping, appear to contribute to the prediction of cannabis related problems beyond frequency of recent use, including risk for dependence. Understanding motives for cannabis use can improve assessment and inform more targeted treatment approaches.

Nicole Schultz

Graduate Student
Auburn University
226 Thach Hall, Alabama

Drew T. Bassett

Graduate Student
Auburn University
Auburn, Alabama

Bryan Messina

Graduate Student
Auburn University
Albuquerque, New Mexico

Christopher Correia

Professor of Psychology
Auburn University
Auburn, Alabama