Category: Addictive Behaviors

PS7- #B54 - BASICS for Alcohol Use in College Students: An Examination of Motivational Interviewing Treatment Fidelity

Friday, Nov 17
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Location: Indigo Ballroom CDGH, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: Motivational Interviewing | Alcohol | College Students

Background: The Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS) is a computerized assessment tool that generates normative feedback (Dimeff, Baer, Kivlahan, & Marlatt, 1999). As an intervention style, MI facilitates intrinsic motivation, and is an effective intervention for behavioral change, including substance use (Miller & Rollnick, 2013; Lundahl et al., 2010). There is substantial support for brief alcohol interventions, including BASICS and effect sizes are generally stronger when combined with MI (Smith & Lipsey, 2015). However, few studies with a college student sample examine the fidelity of MI. The present pilot study coded graduate student MI facilitator’s adherence to an MI style in the context of an alcohol intervention study for college students.
Methods: Thirty-onecollege student drinkers (58% female) completed BASICS and participated in an MI feedback session a week later with one of two trained MI facilitators. Two weeks later, participants completed follow-up measures of self-reported drinking. Audio recordings of feedback sessions were coded for MI treatment integrity by two independent coders using the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity 3.1.1 (MITI; Moyers et al., 2010). Data collection is ongoing.
Results: Graduate student MI facilitators achieved a reliable level of competency (competency suggested at a rating of 4 or higher; Moyers et al., 2010) on the MI global spirit score: facilitator 1, M = 4.22 (SD = .41); facilitator 2, M = 4.31 (SD = .47) with no significant difference between the two facilitators, (t(31) = -.54, p = .595). The facilitators also achieved a reliable level of proficiency (proficiency suggested at a rating of 90% and competency at 100%; Moyers et al., 2010) on percentage of MI-adherent statements: facilitator 1, M = .98 (SD = .04), and facilitator 2, M = 1.00 (SD = .00) with no significant difference between the two facilitators, (t(31) = -1.56, p = .131). The BASICS and MI feedback intervention resulted in a significant decrease in self-reported quantity of drinking between baseline, M = 23.63 (SD = 18.99), and follow-up M = 15.87 (SD = 18.21); t(30) = 3.53, p = .001, d = .633.
Discussion: The present study is unique in documenting training and assessing fidelity of MI in the context of an intervention study with non-mandated college student drinkers who were not necessarily interested in changing their drinking behavior. Graduate student MI facilitators met a high level of competence, with limited variability which resulted in a significant decrease in college student drinking. The present pilot study is limited by a small non-treatment seeking college student sample, use of self-report measures, and a short follow-up assessment.

Stephanie Moss

Graduate Student
Appalachian State University

Chelsea Gruenwald

Appalachian State University

Jamie S. Kirkpatrick

Appalachian State University
Boone

Brittany Kirschner

Graduate Student
Appalachian State University
Boone, North Carolina

Lisa Curtin

Professor
Appalachian State University
Boone, North Carolina