Category: Treatment - ACT

PS8- #B63 - ACT for Nurses and Nursing Aides

Saturday, Nov 18
8:30 AM – 9:30 AM
Location: Indigo Ballroom CDGH, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: ACT (Acceptance & Commitment Therapy) | Clinical Trial

Nurses and aides experience some of the highest rates of work stress, burnout, injury, assault, and abuse relative to any other occupations. Aides also frequently experience significant levels of non-work related stress due to myriad life factors such as single parenthood, poverty, and low educational attainment. Research shows that Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is an effective intervention for work-related stress in other occupations. The present study is a Bureau of Workers’ Compensation grant-funded randomized controlled trial in which nurses and aides are randomly assigned an ACT intervention group or a waitlist control group. The ACT intervention consists of two 2-hour long group-based sessions one week apart. The first session includes creative hopelessness, identifying unworkable control strategies, and present moment awareness. The second session focuses on cognitive defusion, willingness, values identification, and committed action. The goal of the intervention is to provide nursing aides with skills that can be used to reduce injury, assault, and abuse from residents in the nursing homes through training in acceptance, cognitive defusion, and values-based committed action. Thus far, 31 nurses and aides have completed the intervention (n=16 treatment; n=15 control), with the aim of having a total of 100 participants. Participants in the treatment group complete a pre-intervention baseline assessment, a one-month follow up assessment, and a six-month follow up assessment. Participants in the control group complete the same assessments at similar time points.  Key outcomes include: cognitive fusion, mindfulness, work acceptance, work stress, burnout, and rates of injury, assault, and abuse. It is hypothesized that the participants who complete the ACT intervention, relative to the control group participants, will show significant decreases in injuries, assault, abuse, burnout and work stress. Further, it is hypothesized that there will be positive correlations between burnout and rates of injury, assault, and abuse and that these relationships will be mediated by acceptance and mindfulness such that acceptance and mindfulness will weaken the relationships between burnout and injury, assault, and abuse. Finally, it is hypothesized that the ACT participants will report lower levels of cognitive fusion, burnout, work stress, and rates of injury, assault and abuse along with significant increases in acceptance, mindfulness and valued living relative to baseline. These results would support the use of ACT in populations that experience high rates of injury, assault, abuse, and burnout, and the mediational role of mindfulness and acceptance on the effects of burnout.

Mary T. Moeller

Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, Ohio

R. Sonia Singh

Graduate Student
Bowling Green State University

Kristin A. Horan

Bowling Green State University

Rachel Wasson

Clinical Psychology Graduate Student
Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, Ohio

Clare L. Barratt

Bowling Green State University

Steve M. Jex

Bowling Green State University

Russell A. Matthews

Bowling Green State University

William H. O'Brien

Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, Ohio