Category: Dissemination / Implementation

PS7- #C65 - Effectiveness of an Adapted Version of the Unified Protocol in an Urban, Community Mental Health Training Clinic

Friday, Nov 17
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Location: Indigo Ballroom CDGH, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: Community-Based Assessment / Intervention | Transdiagnostic | Evidence-Based Practice

Previous research has demonstrated the efficacy of the Unified Protocol for the Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders (UP) (Barlow et al., 2011) for the treatment of individuals with anxiety and depressive disorders (Farchione et al., 2012). Additionally, research has shown that the UP is an effective treatment when delivered in a group format (Bullis et al., 2015). The objective of the present study was to expand on the extant literature by demonstrating the effectiveness of an adapted version of the UP delivered in a group format for a diverse patient population in an urban, community mental health training clinic in a low socioeconomic status (SES) neighborhood. It was hypothesized that participants would demonstrate a significant improvement in anxiety and depressive symptoms, experiential avoidance, and functioning.


Participants were recruited at an urban, community mental health training clinic where they were receiving individual psychotherapy. The UP program was structured so that two rounds of the group, each lasting approximately three months, would run sequentially. Ten patients were recruited for the first round, and eleven were recruited for the second round. In both rounds, the majority of patients were of culturally diverse backgrounds and of low SES. Their education levels varied. The majority of patients met criteria for comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders and demonstrated impairment in several areas of functioning.


In order to fit the needs of the population, the UP was adapted using an evidence-based practice approach (Sackett, Rosenberg, Gray, Haynes, & Richardson, 1996). Each round of the group was delivered over the course of 10, 60-minute weekly sessions.


Assessments were administered at pre-treatment, mid-treatment, post-treatment, and three-month follow-up. Measures were selected based on those used in previous research of the UP and included the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 (Lovibond & Lovibond, 1995), the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (Marks, Connolly, & Hallam, 1973; Mundt, Marks, Shear, & Greist, 2002), and the Brief Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire (Gámez et al., 2014).


A repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) at an alpha level of .05 will be used to compare the effect of group participation on three assessments across four time points. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics will also be reported.


This study will demonstrate if the implementation of an adapted version of a transdiagnostic, efficacious cognitive-behavioral treatment is capable of producing significant change in symptoms and functioning in a diverse patient population at an urban, community mental health training clinic in a low SES neighborhood. The UP precludes the need for multiple treatments targeting individual diagnoses, thereby reducing the time and cost for patients of low SES presenting with comorbid conditions. The patient population in settings such as these could benefit greatly from this parsimonious treatment, indicating the need to assess its effectiveness in this context.

Julie Rones

Graduate Student
Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University

Shira Kelin

Graduate Student
Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University

Sara Rothschild

Graduate Student
Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University

Jenna Feldman

Graduate Student
Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University

Elaina Servidio

Graduate Student
Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology
Hartsdale, New York

Jamie Schumpf

Assistant Director of Clinical Training
Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University