Category: ADHD - Child

PS6- #B35 - Relation Between Emotion Recognition and Peer Victimization Among Children With ADHD

Friday, Nov 17
2:45 PM – 3:45 PM
Location: Indigo Ballroom CDGH, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: ADHD - Child / Adolescent | Emotion | Social Relationships

Introduction: Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are more likely to experience peer victimization and demonstrate emotion recognition deficits relative to unaffected peers. Although peer victimization and emotion recognition have been investigated independently in children with ADHD, there is a paucity of literature examining the extent to which emotion recognition deficits are associated with peer victimization. The current study sought to examine the relation between emotion recognition and peer victimization among children with ADHD.

Method:
Twenty-nine children with ADHD (M age = 8.7 ± 1.4 years) participated in the present study. Children completed the Perception of Peer Support Scale, a 12-item self-report measure of peer victimization experiences, and the Reading the Mind in the Eyes task, a 28-item assessment of emotion recognition. Bivariate correlations and hierarchical regression models were used to evaluate the relation between emotion recognition and child self-perceived peer victimization.

Results:  
Hierarchical regression analyses significantly supported the relation of emotion recognition to peer victimization among children with ADHD, such that children who demonstrated lower emotion recognition scores on the Reading the Mind in the Eyes task self-reported higher rates of peer victimization (β = -.48, t = -2.24, p = .036) above and beyond the effects of age, sex, and ADHD medications.

Conclusion:
The current study represents a preliminary analysis on the relation between emotion recognition and peer victimization among children with ADHD. Overall, results suggest that poorer emotion recognition abilities are associated with increased rates of self-perceived peer victimization experiences among children with ADHD. Implications, limitations and future directions are discussed.

Nicholas D. Fogleman

Graduate Student
University of Louisville
Louisville, Kentucky

Kelly E. Slaughter

Graduate Student
University of Louisville
Louisville, Kentucky

Kirsten Leaberry

Graduate Student
University of Louisville

Danielle Walerius

Graduate Student
University of Louisville

Paul J. Rosen

Associate Professor of Psychology
University of Louisville