Category: Assessment

PS6- #C69 - Validation of the Adolescent Routines Questionnaire-Parent and Self-Report: Relationship to Parent-Child Communication

Friday, Nov 17
2:45 PM – 3:45 PM
Location: Indigo Ballroom CDGH, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: Adolescents | Measurement

Family routines, defined as patterned interactions within the family context that occur regularly over time (Fiese et al., 2002), have been shown to provide, positive short and long-term outcomes in youth. Research consistently has supported the contribution of routines on buffering the impact of adverse events on children’s adjustment.  Research has documented the moderating effects of family routines on the impact of financial hardship (Budescu & Taylor, 2013; Taylor & Lopez, 2005), chronic medical conditions (Greening, Stoppelbein, Konishi, Jordan, & Moll, 2007), and exposure to natural disasters (Botey & Kulig, 2013). Examination of routines in relation to child outcomes, however, has focused primarily on children; very few studies have examined the association of routines and psychological adjustment in adolescents. One reason for this is the lack of psychometrically sound measurement tools specifically designed for use in adolescent populations. 

The aim of the current investigation is to address this shortcoming by developing and validating a revision of the Adolescent Routines Questionnaire: Parent & Self-Report (ARQ: P/S).  To improve the psychometric properties of the previously developed measure, the item pool was expanded and items were rewritten for clarity. 226 parent-adolescent dyads completed the ARQ: P/S.  Items were eliminated based on redundancy or low frequency. Preliminary exploratory factor analyses of the ARQ: P produced a 30-item measure with a five-factor solution that accounted for 47.93% of the variance. The factors include: Social & Extra Curricular Routines, Household/Family Routines, Time Management, Hygiene Routines, and Routine Family Communication. The measure demonstrates good internal consistency (α = .85) as well as moderate evidence of concurrent validity (r = .43, p < .001) with an established measure of family routines designed for younger children. Furthermore, the ARQ: P is positively correlated with adolescent-reported positive adjustment (r = .32, p < .001) and negatively correlated with parent-reported ADHD symptoms (r = -.38, p < .001) and parent-reported parent-adolescent conflict (r = -.38, p < .001). Preliminary evidence indicate that the ARQ:P is a promising assessment tool for measuring adolescent daily routines. Similar analyses will be conducted on the adolescent sample to obtain a parallel measure of self-reported routines. 

Jennifer Piscitello

Graduate Student
Louisiana State University
Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Ryan N. Cummins

Graduate Student
Louisiana State University
Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Mary Lou Kelley

Director of Clinical Training
Louisiana State University