Category: Child / Adolescent - Anxiety

PS11- #B46 - An Open Trial Piloting the Feasibility, Acceptability, and Benefits of a Psychoeducational Series for Middle School Students

Saturday, Nov 18
12:15 PM – 1:15 PM
Location: Indigo Ballroom CDGH, Level 2, Indigo Level

Keywords: Child Anxiety | School | Prevention

Anxiety disorders are common, distressing, and disruptive psychological conditions for children and youth. Various school-based prevention and early intervention programs emphasizing cognitive and behavioral principles which target anxious symptoms show promising results. Schools are places well-suited to deliver these psychoeducational programs for a variety of reasons.  Accordingly, this project is an open trial examining the feasibility, acceptability, and benefits of an innovative psychoeducational course (Project Chill)  targeting anxious symptoms in middle school students.  The study tests two main hypotheses. First, Project Chill, will be perceived as feasible and acceptable as measured by participants’ ratings on Session Feedback Forms. Second, the program will be evaluated as beneficial as measured by participants' rank ordered and qualitative ’responses to items assessing their acquired knowledge on the Session Feedback Form. Five focused psychoeducational sessions based on the prototypical FEAR plan will be provided to children enrolled in the seventh and eighth grades in a local private school. The sessions emphasize affective education, relaxation, cognitive restructuring and problem-solving as well as behavioral experiments. The psychoeducational material and coping skills will be taught in an inviting manner through gifs, film clips, cartoon graphics, and popular music.   All sessions will be delivered in a classroom wide format.  Following each session, students will complete a session feedback form which taps perceptions of the session and acquired knowledge. The Session Feedback Form developed explicitly for this study consists of 5 simple questions  tapping perceptions of helpfulness, fun, and engagingness as well as asking students to list what they learned and as well as rank what they found to be most helpful in each session.  Interval level data will be analyzed via t-tests and ANOVAs. Ordinal data will be evaluated via the Mann Whitney U and Wilcoxson signed ranks tests. Qualitative responses will be analyzed for common themes.


 


 


 


 


 

Erica V. Rozbruch

Clinical Psychology Ph.D. Student
Palo Alto University
Mountain View, California

Robert D. Friedberg

Professor
CSTAY at Palo Alto University
Palo Alto University, California

Aniya Atasuntseva

Ph.D Student
Center for the Study and Treatment of Anxious Youth at Palo Alto University
Santa Clara, California

Andrea S. Wister

Ph.D. Student
Center for the Study and Treatment of Anxious Youth at Palo Alto University
Sunnyvale, California

Nicole D. Wilberding

Ph.D. Student
Center for the Study and Treatment of Anxious Youth at Palo Alto University
Belmont, California

Rebecca N. La Prade

Ph.D. Student
Center for the Study and Treatment of Anxious Youth at Palo Alto University
San Francisco, California

Cameron Mosely

Ph.D. Student
Center for the Study and Treatment of Anxious Youth at Palo Alto University
Cuperino, California

Judy Feezer

Ph.D Student
Center for the Study and Treatment of Anxious Youth at Palo Alto University
Redwood City, California

Krista Basile

Palo Alto University
Center for the Study and Treatment of Anxious Youth at Palo Alto University
Burlingame, California

Amanda Moscowitz

Psy.D Student
Stanford University-Palo Alto University Psy.D. Consortium
Menlo Park, California

Jiayi Lin

Psy.D Student
Stanford University-Palo Alto University Psy.D. Consortium
Redwood City, California