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B. Taylor Bennett, DVM, PhD, DACLAM, DACAW

Management Consultant and Senior Scientific Advisor, National Association for Biomedical Research

presenter photoDr. B. Taylor Bennett, DVM, PhD, DACLAM, DACAW obtained his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from Auburn University and his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois Medical School. He currently serves as the Senior Scientific Advisor for the National Association for Biomedical Research (NABR). He spent 36 years at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) overseeing their animal care and use program. The last ten of those years he served as the Associate Vice Chancellor for Research Resources where he was responsible for 14 campus wide core research support services. Dr. Bennett has been active in a variety of professional organizations and currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Scientist Center for Animal Welfare and as Chair of the Board of the ASLAP Foundation.

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David J. Lyons, PhD

Director, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee and Animal Welfare Program, Wake Forest University School of Medicine

presenter photoDavid J. Lyons, PhD, is director of the Wake Forest Animal Welfare Program and the IACUC. He received his BS from Pennsylvania State University in molecular and cellular biology, and then completed his PhD in behavioral neuroscience at Boston University. After a post-doctoral fellowship at Harvard Medical School, he conducted research investigating the neural basis of substance abuse in animals at the Wake Forest School of Medicine. In 2001, he left the laboratory and became an administrator in the Office of Research at Wake Forest School of Medicine. Between 2001 and 2007, he wore different hats as a grants administrator, interim director of industry relations, and strategic planner, until taking on his current role in animal research oversight.

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Thea Brabb, DVM, PhD, DACLAM

Attending Veterinarian, Department of Comparative Medicine, University of Washington

Dr. Thea Brabb, DVM, Ph.D., DACLAM is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Comparative Medicine at the University of Washington. Dr. Brabb received her D.V.M. from the University of Illinois and after 7 years of private veterinary practice, entered a residency program in Laboratory Animal Medicine at the University of Washington, completed a Ph.D., and became a Diplomat of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine. At the University of Washington, she participates in management of the Veterinary Services Unit, rotates as one of the senior faculty overseeing the veterinary care of the research animals, shares responsibility for the Department of Comparative Medicine teaching program, is the co-director of the University of Washington ACLAM Training Program, and actively participates in research. Her primary research interest is mouse models of autoimmunity and she currently is involved in projects investigating he role of infections on the development of inflammatory bowel disease and cancer. Dr. Brabb is the University of Washington’s Attending Veterinarian and in that role serves on the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee, Institutional Biosafety Committee and Infectious Waste Committee.

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Hot Topics and Emerging Trends Track

Breakout Sessions – Series A

A10 - An Open Discussion About Sharing Adverse Events (AEs): Should the Animal Research Community Use Reporting to Establish Best Practices?

Friday, April 1

10:45 AM - 12:00 PM

Faculty(s):

B. Taylor Bennett, DVM, PhD, DACLAM, DACAW

Management Consultant and Senior Scientific Advisor, National Association for Biomedical Research

David J. Lyons, PhD

Director, Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee and Animal Welfare Program, Wake Forest University School of Medicine

Thea Brabb, DVM, PhD, DACLAM

Attending Veterinarian, Department of Comparative Medicine, University of Washington

The effective management of an AE in research with animals involves a host of demanding activities: root-cause analysis, creation of a resolution plan, consideration of preventive measures, as well as internal and external communication. It stands to reason that the research community, as a whole, could benefit from lessons learned by individual institutes and by the discovery of patterns of events across institutes. However, the information currently collected via regulatory reporting is limited in scope, and sharing AEs openly by some other means without appropriate safeguards could make an institution vulnerable to criticism. The purpose of this session is to have an open discussion about how the animal research community might benefit by leveraging the extensive work already being done to address AEs. During this session, faculty and attendees will:


  • Thoughtfully consider the value of sharing AEs for collective analysis
  • Brainstorm about how to operationalize AE sharing and analysis, the distribution of community alerts, and the promotion of best practices
  • Learn about persons and organizations with an interest in advancing the use of AE reporting for the benefit of the research community
Slides