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Richard P. Kluft, MD, PhD

Clinical Professor, Temple University School of Medicine, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania

presenter photoRichard P. Kluft, M.D., Ph.D., practices psychiatry, psychoanalysis, and medical hypnosis in Bala Cynwyd, PA. He is a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Temple University School of Medicine, and on the faculty of the Psychoanalytic Center of Philadelphia. He has published over 250 scientific papers and book chapters. His recent book, Shelter from the Storm (2013), an exploration of a compassionate approach to the abreaction of trauma, won the 2013 Written Media Award of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation. He has edited several books; he and Catherine G. Fine, Ph.D., co-edited Clinical Perspectives on Multiple Personality Disorder. Dr. Kluft was Editor-in-Chief of the journal DISSOCIATION for ten years. He has presented over 1,000 scientific papers and workshops. He was a co-founder and an early President of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation, and has been President of the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis and the Society for Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis. He has received numerous awards for his published research and his clinical and teaching contributions. These include four Erickson Awards for the best scientific paper of the year in hypnosis. Dr. Kluft served as a consultant to Dreamworks’ and Showtime’s series, “The United States of Tara.” He was featured in the Showtime documentary, “What Is DID? With Richard P. Kluft, M.D,” which won the 2009 Media Award of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation. Dr. Kluft is currently writing a series of books about the treatment of chronic complex dissociative disorders. His first novel, Good Shrink/Bad Shrink, and a novella, How Fievel Stole the Moon: A Tale for Sweet Children and Sour Scholars, were published in 2014. His second novel, An Obituary to Die For, will be published soon.

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Warwick Middleton, MB BS, FRANZCP, MD

Director, Trauma and Dissociation Unit, Belmont Hospital; Chair, The Cannan Institute; Board Member ISSTD, Professorial Appointments at Latrobe University, Canterbury University and University of New England, Associate Professor, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

presenter photoProfessor Middleton has had substantive ongoing involvement with research, writing, teaching (including workshops and seminar presentations), supervision and conference convening. He has made substantial and ongoing contributions to the bereavement and trauma literatures and was with Dr Jeremy Butler author of the first published series in the Australian scientific literature detailing the abuse histories and clinical phenomenology of patients fulfilling diagnostic criteria for Dissociative Identity Disorder. Professor Middleton, who holds senior honorary appointments at La Trobe University, the University of New England, the University of Canterbury and the University of Queensland, was the first researcher to publish systematic research into ongoing incestuous abuse during adulthood. He is the current President-Elect of the ISSTD, is Chair of the ISSTD Membership Committee, and Vice-Chair of the ISSTD Scientific Committee. Prof Middleton chairs The Cannan Institute. In 1996 he was a principal architect in establishing Australia’s first dedicated unit treating dissociative disorders (the Trauma and Dissociation Unit, Belmont Hospital).

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020 – Invited Presentation

Plenary 2: Weaponized Sex, Love Songs to Suicide, and Anguished Silences: Moving from Observation to Insight to Innovation in the Treatment of DID and Related States

Saturday, November 28

11:15 AM - 12:15 PM

Room: Ballroom 1 & 2

Presenter(s):

Richard P. Kluft, MD, PhD

Clinical Professor, Temple University School of Medicine, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania

Chair(s):

Warwick Middleton, MB BS, FRANZCP, MD

Director, Trauma and Dissociation Unit, Belmont Hospital; Chair, The Cannan Institute; Board Member ISSTD, Professorial Appointments at Latrobe University, Canterbury University and University of New England, Associate Professor, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

The study and the treatment of the dissociative disorders has generated a plethora of newer theories and approaches, none of which have demonstrated effectiveness superior to the models they are put forward to replace. I will argue that while conceptually-driven patterns of intervention have certain strengths, the fact that no model advanced to date actually addresses the full range of dissociative phenomena guarantees that each will fall short of providing optimal guidance to the clinician. Instead, I will describe how the intense study of selected clinical phenomena and clinical research suggest insights that in turn facilitate the development of new treatment interventions. Critical incidents related to the defensive use of aggressive sexualization, sexual reenactments, dedicated preoccupation with self-destruction, prolonged silences and associated stalemates in treatment, and moments of decompensation during trauma work will be explored to demonstrate how many techniques useful for the treatment of DID and related states are the natural outcome of working up from clinical observations rather than down from theoretical models. Dissociative phenomena are always trying to teach us how to help dissociative patients, but sometimes we must engage in quite a struggle to clear our own minds and appreciate those lessons.