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Richard G. Soper, MD, JD, MS, FASAM, DABAM

Chief, Addiction Medicine and Chair, Board of Directors, Center for Behavior Wellness, Nashville, Tennessee

presenter photoRichard Soper, MD, JD, MS; is the chief medical officer and director of addiction medicine at Center for Behavioral Wellness, Nashville, Tennessee. Dr. Soper has three board certifications one of which is Addiction Medicine. He has practiced addiction medicine for over eighteen years. He is and/or has been affiliated with Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Adm. USHHS; American Psychological Association; NAADAC, the Association for Addiction Professionals; Menninger Clinic; North Carolina and Tennessee Physician's Health Programs; Tennessee Lawyers Assistance Program, Tennessee Department of Health; and other institutions.  Dr. Soper is a director of the Nashville Academy of Medicine, a past director of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, past-president of the Tennessee Society of Addiction Medicine; a delegate to the Tennessee Medical Association; consulting physician for Middle Tennessee County Drug Courts (2); founding editor and emeritus Editor-in-Chief of the American Society of Addiction Medicine e-weekly news journal with 16,000 subscribers; and has been selected by Consumer's Research Council of America as one of America's Top Physicians. He currently serves on several regional and national medical organizations committees and advisory boards. He has published articles in the addiction and recovery literature, and has presented across the country on various problems associated with substance abuse, addictions, and co-occurring disorders.

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Hendrée E. Jones, PhD

Professor of OB/GYN and Executive Director Horizons Program, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

presenter photoHendree Jones, PhD is a Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and Executive Director of Horizons, a comprehensive drug treatment program for pregnant and parenting women and their drug-exposed children. She is also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Psychology, UNC, Chapel Hill and an Adjunct Professor in the Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Jones is an internationally recognized expert in the development and examination of both behavioral and pharmacologic treatments for pregnant women and their children in risky life situations. Dr. Jones has received continuous funding from the United States National Institutes of Health since 1994 and has published over 165 publications, two books on treating substance use disorders (one for pregnant and parenting women and the other for a more general population of patients), several book and textbook chapters. She is a consultant for the United Nations and the World Health Organization. Dr. Jones leads or is involved in projects in Afghanistan, the Southern Cone, the Republic of Georgia, South Africa, and the United States which are focused on improving the lives of children, women and families.

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Focus Session Track

Intimate Partner Violence and Relationship with Substance Addiction in Childhood and Adulthood

4/25/2015

2:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Room: 410, Fourth Floor

Presenter(s):

Richard G. Soper, MD, JD, MS, FASAM, DABAM

Chief, Addiction Medicine and Chair, Board of Directors, Center for Behavior Wellness, Nashville, Tennessee

Hendrée E. Jones, PhD

Professor of OB/GYN and Executive Director Horizons Program, UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Women who are mistreated in childhood are more likely than non-mistreated counterparts to experience intimate partner violence (IPV). In the USA, nearly one in four women report experiencing violence by a current or from a former spouse or boyfriend at some point in their life. Substance use plays a facilitative role in IPV by precipitating or exacerbating violence. Although intimate partner violence remains a public health concern, there have been advances in our basic understanding of how to treat both victims and perpetrators with co-occurring substance abuse and addiction. This workshop will provide clinicians with specialized tools to confidently and competently identify and intervene on substance use and IPV. At the end of the workshop addiction medicine specialists with leave a neurodevelopmental view of childhood trauma that can help guide assessment and intervention with IPV victims. Providers will also acquire practical tools to identify past and current IPV, make brief office interventions to assist IPV victims, and offer strategies to refer women for subspecialty and community-based evaluation, treatment, and advocacy.