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Darius Rastegar, MD, FASAM

Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland

presenter photoDr. Rastegar provides treatment for substance use disorders in an outpatient primary care setting and an inpatient unit. He is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and is the medical director for the Chemical Dependence Unit at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. He is the co-author of The ASAM Handbook of Addiction Medicine.

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Anika Alvanzo, MD, MS

Assistant Professor, Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, BALTIMORE, Maryland

presenter photoAnika Alvanzo, MD, MS is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine where she is also the Director of the Johns Hopkins Hospital Substance Use Disorders Consultation Service (SUDS). Dr. Alvanzo is a graduate of the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences and holds a master’s degree in biostatistics from Virginia Commonwealth University. She is board certified in both Internal Medicine and a Diplomate of the American Board of Addiction Medicine. As the Director of the SUDS, Dr. Alvanzo oversees a multidisciplinary consultation service that provides guidance on the clinical management of patients with substance use disorders and associated consequences, performs brief behavioral interventions and counseling for hospitalized patients, facilitates linkage to hospital and community-based alcohol and drug treatment programs, and educates patients, families, healthcare professionals and the community to prevent, identify, and treat persons living with addiction. Dr. Alvanzo is also the Director of the Substance Use Disorders Rotation for the Johns Hopkins Medicine-Pediatrics Urban Health and Urban Health Primary Care Residency track programs. Her research interests include gender and race/ethnicity differences in the risk for substance use disorders, integration of technology for screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment in diverse settings and the association between psychological trauma, traumatic stress, and substance use. In particular, she is interested in the mechanisms by which histories of physical and/or sexual violence confer increased risk for substance use disorders and in the development of interventions for co-occurring traumatic stress and substance misuse in women.

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Kenneth Stoller, MD

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Director, Johns Hopkins Broadway Center for Addictions, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland

presenter photoAn Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Johns Hopkins, Dr. Stoller directs the Broadway Center, the outpatient drug and alcohol outpatient treatment center at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. His area of expertise is treatment and clinical research involving substance use problems, particularly those involving pharmacotherapies for opioid dependence. Current interests center on cost/economic issues as they relate to drug addiction and treatment, enhancing adherence and retention, and integrative/collaborative treatment of co-occurring psychiatric, somatic, pain and substance use disorders. Through his work at Johns Hopkins HealthCare, he has focused on fostering policies and initiatives applied in managed care settings to improve health outcomes while controling costs.

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Yngvild Olsen, MD, MPH

Medical Director, Institutes for Behavior Resources, Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

presenter photoYngvild Olsen, MD, MPH, currently serves as Medical Director of the Institutes for Behavior Resources Inc/REACH Health Services, a comprehensive outpatient Opioid Treatment Program in Baltimore City. She completed her medical training at Harvard Medical School, and internal medicine residency with a year as Primary Care Chief Resident at the Boston Medical Center. She received a Master’s in Public Health from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health as part of a fellowship in General Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. She has previously served as the Vice President of Clinical Affairs for the Baltimore Substance Abuse Systems, as the Deputy Health Officer for the Harford County Health Department, and as the Medical Director for the Johns Hopkins Hospital’s outpatient substance use treatment services. Dr. Olsen’s past advocacy work includes serving as the President of the Maryland Society of Addiction Medicine (MDSAM), as the President of the Maryland Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence (MATOD), and as a member of several boards and councils, including Governor Hogan's Heroin Taskforce and the Baltimore City Mayor's Heroin Taskforce. Currently, Dr. Olsen serves on the National Council on Alcoholism and Other Drug Dependence-Maryland chapter board, as the Chair of the Maryland Behavioral Health Advisory Council, and as a member of the ASAM Board of Directors. She also chairs ASAM's Public Policy Committee.

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Focus Session Track

Medical Management for Opioid Use Disorders: Current Evidence and Future Directions

4/24/2015

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Room: 400/402, Fourth Floor

Organizer (Presenting)(s):

Darius Rastegar, MD, FASAM

Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland

Presenter(s):

Anika Alvanzo, MD, MS

Assistant Professor, Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, BALTIMORE, Maryland

Kenneth Stoller, MD

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Director, Johns Hopkins Broadway Center for Addictions, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland

Yngvild Olsen, MD, MPH

Medical Director, Institutes for Behavior Resources, Inc., Baltimore, Maryland

Individuals diagnosed with opioid use disorder have three FDA-approved options for pharmacotherapy to support their recovery – methadone, buprenorphine and naltrexone (both oral and extended release). There are important pharmacologic and regulatory differences between these options. These medications have traditionally been delivered in different settings and under varying models of care. While there is ample evidence to support the use of each of these medications, there is relatively little research comparing these treatments and models of care, or on matching patients to the optimal combination of medication, setting and model of care. Research on coordination of care and movement between medications and settings is even more scant. The presenters will review the use of each medication, focusing on comparative efficacy, logistical differences (e.g., setting, integrated services, regulations, availability), and models of care. The pros and cons of each will be reviewed with a focus on matching individuals to the optimal treatment. This will be concluded with a presentation on a novel integrated treatment model that provides a continuum of care with varying medications in different treatment settings.