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Jag H. Khalsa, MS, PhD

Chief, Medical Consequences Branch (Drug Abuse and Infections), DPMC, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland

presenter photoDr. Jag Khalsa, with about 50 years of experience in drug research, serves as the Chief of the Medical Consequences Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, DHHS; is responsible for developing/administering a national and international program of clinical research on medical and health consequences of drug abuse and co-occurring infections (HIV, HCV, and others). Prior to joining NIDA in 1987, he served for ~10 yrs as a pharmacologist/toxicologist assessing safety (carcinogenic/teratogenic) potential of chemicals [INDs/NDAs] and food additives) and clinical evaluator at FDA. He has published in pharmacology, toxicology, epidemiology and medical journals. He serves on editorial boards of Journals of Addiction Medicine, Research on HIV/AIDS and Palliative Care, Frontiers of Neuroscience, and Clinical Infectious Diseases. He also serves on numerous Federal and NIH level committees including the HHS Viral Hepatitis Implementation Group (VHIG), National Commission on Digestive Diseases and its two sub-committees (Liver Research, Diabetes Research), Federal Task Force on TB, NIH Steering Committee on Centers for AIDS Research. He has received distinguished service awards from the FDA Commissioner, NIDA and NIH Directors, Society of Neuro-Immune-Pharmacology (SNIP), Life Time Achievement Awards from SNIP and International Conference on Molecular Medicine (India) and MIT, India; a commendation from the US Congress, Awards of Merit from the International Society of Addiction Medicine (ISAM), the President of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), and a Certificate of Appreciation from the Office of Assistant Secretary for Health (Drs. Howard Koh and Ron Valdiserri), DHHS. He has a Ph.D. in neuro-psycho-pharmacology, a Master’s degree in herbal pharmacology/medicine, post-doctoral training in CNS/Cardiovascular pharmacology at SK&F, and Toxicology at SRI International. E-mail: jk98p@nih.gov

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Jeffrey H. Samet, MD, MA, MPH

Chief and Professor of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts

presenter photoDr. Samet is a graduate of Brandeis University and Baylor College of Medicine. He trained in Internal Medicine at Boston City Hospital, Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), and in a research fellowship at the Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been a primary care physician in Boston since 1983. Dr. Samet is a Professor of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine and Professor of Community Health Sciences at the Boston University School of Public Health. In 2002, he became the Chief of General Internal Medicine at BUSM/Boston Medical Center and Vice Chair for Public Health in the Department of Medicine. Dr. Samet has a longstanding commitment to educating physicians about substance use disorders. From 1995-2012 he served as Medical Director of Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Services for the Boston Public Health Commission. He was President of the Association of Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (1999- 2001), co-chair of the Substance Abuse Task Force of the Society of General Internal Medicine (1992-2002), and a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Addressing the Quality Chasm in Mental Health and Addictive Disorders. Dr. Samet chaired the ASAM Medical-Scientific Annual Conference Program Committee 2004-2010 and 2012-2013 he served as President of the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM) and the ABAM Foundation .

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David L. Thomas, MD, MPH

Director, Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland

presenter photoDAVID L. THOMAS, M.D., M.P.H., is Chief of Infectious Diseases and the Stanhope Bayne-Jones Professor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Dr. Thomas is trained in internal medicine and infectious diseases and cares for patients with infectious diseases including chronic viral hepatitis. He also oversees clinical research projects whose aims are focused on understanding the natural history and pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus infection. Liver disease in HIV infected persons is a special area of clinical and research focus. He is the principal investigator on numerous National Institutes of Health grants and the author or co-author of over 200 peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Thomas has served the National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control, and IDSA in multiple capacities has won international recognition for his academic contributions.

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Symposium Track

Clinical Management of Substance Abusers with Co-occurring HIV and HCV Infections

4/25/2015

11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Room: Governors Ballroom D, Fourth Floor

Organizer (Presenting)(s):

Jag H. Khalsa, MS, PhD

Chief, Medical Consequences Branch (Drug Abuse and Infections), DPMC, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland

Jeffrey H. Samet, MD, MA, MPH

Chief and Professor of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts

Presenter(s):

David L. Thomas, MD, MPH

Director, Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland

Over 33 million people are living with HIV infection and 170 million with hepatitis C infection worldwide, and approximately 1 million people live with HIV and 4 million with HCV infection in the US alone. Injection drug use plays a major role in acquisition, transmission, and increased disease progression of both infections. With an emerging epidemic of HCV infection among young IDUs and a higher number of deaths related to HCV than with HIV, it is essential that appropriate treatment interventions are made available to clinically manage addiction and co-occurring infections in substance abusing patients. This NIDA-sponsored session will discuss current data on clinical management of infections (HIV and HCV) among substance abusing populations and also provide directions for future research. Speakers will discuss their current clinical experience and problems associated with the use of HIV antiretroviral therapies and HCV antiviral medications, especially the newly approved directly acting antiviral medications, for the treatment of HIV and/or HCV infection among substance abusing patients. In addition, the funding opportunities at NIH will be discussed.