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Robert L. DuPont, MD

President, Institute for Behavior and Health, Inc., Rockville, Maryland

presenter photoFor more than 40 years, Robert L. DuPont, M.D. has been a leader in drug abuse prevention and treatment. He served as the first Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (1973-1978) and as the second White House Drug Chief (1973-1977). From 1968-1970 he was Director of Community Services for the District of Columbia Department of Corrections, heading parole and half-way house services. From 1970-1973, he served as Administrator of the District of Columbia Narcotics Treatment Administration. Following this distinguished public career, in 1978 Dr. DuPont became the founding president of the Institute for Behavior and Health, Inc., a non-profit organization that identifies and promotes big new ideas to reduce illegal drug use. He has been Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the Georgetown University School of Medicine since 1980. A graduate of Emory University, Dr. DuPont received an M.D. degree in 1963 from the Harvard Medical School. He completed his psychiatric training at Harvard and the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. Dr. DuPont is a Life Fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. His activities in ASAM include chairing the forensic science committee from 1995 to 2004, and serving as Co-Chair of the two White Paper writing committees that produced The Role of the Physician in “Medical” Marijuana in 2010 and State-Level Proposals to Legalize Marijuana in 2012. He served as Chair of the writing committee that produced Drug Testing: A White Paper of the American Society of Addiction Medicine in 2013. He is also a Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association and was chairman of the Drug Dependence Section of the World Psychiatric Association from 1974 to 1979. In 1989 he became a founding member of the Medical Review Officer Committee of ASAM.

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Mark S. Gold, MD, FASAM

Adjunct Professor, Washington University in St. Louis, Alachua, Florida

presenter photoMark S. Gold is a translational researcher, author, and inventor best known for his work on the brain systems underlying the effects of opiate drugs. He proposed a novel model for opiate action, dependence, and withdrawal changing the way opiate action was understood. This locus coeruleus theory of opiate and drug withdrawal is a mainstay of 2014 theory and practice, even though he proposed it in 1978. Gold is the senior author on the discovery paper and was awarded a patent for the discovery of new uses for clonidine which remains widely used for opiate withdrawal and pain management. Drs. Gold and Herbert Kleber were the first to suggest sequential use of clonidine and Naltrexone. During 1980s Gold and colleagues developed a new theory for cocaine action, dependence, and withdrawal based on his understanding of the dopamine-rich areas of the brain. While most at the time did not consider cocaine addictive because of the lack of a classic withdrawal syndrome, Gold proposed a dopamine theory of pathological attachment, loss of control and addiction. He also has worked for over 30 years trying to understand overeating as related to drug of abuse or addiction models. He described Food Addiction in several classic papers and texts. He has served on numerous governmental as well as private psychiatric boards and panels. His work reduced stigma, served as the basis for many educational and prevention campaigns and changed the lives of addicts with basic and applied science leading to new evidence-based treatment. Dr. Gold is a multiple patent holder, author of nearly 1,000 publications. He is a Distinguished Alumnus of Washington University, University of Florida and Yale University. Currently he is an Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at Washington University in St Louis and the Chairman of the Scientific Advisory Boards for RiverMend Health.

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Wilson M. Compton, MD, MPE

Deputy Director, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Rockville, Maryland

presenter photoSince 2013, Wilson M. Compton, M.D., M.P.E. has been Deputy Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) of the National Institutes of Health where his responsibilities include providing scientific leadership and support to the NIDA Director in the development, implementation, and management of NIDA’s research portfolio. From 2002-2013, Dr. Compton served as the Director of NIDA’s Division of Epidemiology, Services and Prevention Research where he oversaw the scientific direction of a public health research program of national and international scope addressing: 1) the extent and spread of drug abuse, 2) how to prevent drug abuse, and 3) how to implement drug abuse prevention and treatment services as effectively as possible. Of note, he led development of a large scale longitudinal population study of more than 45,000 persons ages 12+ to assess the impact of new tobacco regulations in the United States. Before joining NIDA, Dr. Compton was Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the Master in Psychiatric Epidemiology Program at Washington University in Saint Louis as well as Medical Director of Addiction Services at the Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Dr. Compton received his undergraduate education from Amherst College. He attended medical school and completed residency training in psychiatry at Washington University. During his career, Dr. Compton has achieved multiple scientific accomplishments: he was selected to serve as a member of the DSM-5 Revision Task Force; is the author of more than 150 articles and chapters, and is an invited speaker at multiple high-impact venues. Dr. Compton is a member of numerous professional organizations, including the Alpha Omega Alpha medical education honor society. Dr. Compton is the recipient of multiple awards, including the Senior Scholar Health Services Research Award from the American Psychiatric Association and the Paul Hoch Award from the American Psychopathological Association.

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Thomas McLellan, PhD

Board Chairman, Treatment Research Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

presenter photoDr. McLellan has been a career researcher for 35 years with the Treatment Research Institute (which he co-founded in 1992) and the University of Pennsylvania.. In his career he has published over 400 articles and chapters on addiction research. He has received several distinguished awards including Life Achievement Awards from the American, Swedish, Italian and British Societies of Addiction Medicine and most recently from the American Purblic Health Association (2010). During 2009 – 2010 Dr. McLellan was the senate-confirmed Deputy Director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, where he was one of the principal authors of the President’s National Drug Control Strategy. Dr. McLellan holds a B.A. from Colgate University and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Bryn Mawr College. He received postgraduate training in psychology at Oxford University in England.

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Workshop Track

Five-Year Recovery: A New Standard for Assessing Effectiveness of Treatment

4/26/2015

8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

Room: Governors Ballroom D, Fourth Floor

Organizer (Presenting)(s):

Robert L. DuPont, MD

President, Institute for Behavior and Health, Inc., Rockville, Maryland

Presenter(s):

Mark S. Gold, MD, FASAM

Adjunct Professor, Washington University in St. Louis, Alachua, Florida

Wilson M. Compton, MD, MPE

Deputy Director, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Rockville, Maryland

Thomas McLellan, PhD

Board Chairman, Treatment Research Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Despite years of support for the concept of addiction as a “chronic disease” that requires addressing multiple patient needs over many years,much substance abuse treatment is implemented as short-term, stand-alone care. Patients are treated for one substance at a time without regard for the reality that there are few patients using only one addictive substance. The commitment of medicine to emphasize prevention, including preventing relapse, and chronic disease management is conspicuously missing in substance abuse treatment. The model of physician health programs (PHP) has set a new standard for long-term outcomes for substance use disorders. These outcomes are evaluated over the course of five years with the standard of not using alcohol or other drugs of abuse. Presenters propose adopting a similar five-year recovery outcome standard for substance abuse treatment. Adopting this standard would create a standard against which all treatments for substance use disorders are measured and encourage treatment programs to adapt their programs to better achieve this goal. This standard is similar to the standard five-year survival rates used in cancer treatment.