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Evan Alexandrou, RN, BHealth, ICU Cert, MPH, PhD

Senior Lecturer and Clinical Nurse Consultant, University of Western Sydnet and Liverpool Hospital, Sydney - NSW, Australia

Evan Alexandrou is a lecturer with the School of Nursing and Midwifery at the University of Western Sydney teaching in the undergraduate Bachelor of Nursing program. Evan is an actively involved clinician. He is an advanced practice nurse working as a Clinical Nurse Specialist in Central Venous Access and Intensive Care at Liverpool Hospital, where he divides his time undertaking clinical care of critically patients and also inserting central venous catheters. Evan is involved in clinical education at an undergraduate and postgraduate level. Evan teaches in both the undergraduate nursing and medical programs at the University of Western Sydney and is also a conjoint lecturer with the South West Sydney Clinical School for the University of New South Wales. Evan's education also extends to a postgraduate level, where he is involved the tutoring intensive care, anaesthetic and emergency medical trainees in central venous access and arterial access. Evan has many years of critical care experience and has held different positions including Clinical Nurse Consultant for the New South Wales Metropolitan Critical Care Plan, Clinical Nurse Consultant for the Medical Emergency Team and flight nurse with Care Flight International. Evan's research interests include improvements in patient safety and monitoring, advanced clinical nursing practice and health services research. Evan is currently a PhD candidate, where his thesis explores nurse led central venous access there procedural outcomes.

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Clinical Practice & Evidence Track

F102 – Oral Abstract Presentations (F102)

A Global Prevalence Study on Peripheral Catheters – The OMG PIVC Study

calendar9/8/2014

clock3:00 PM - 3:15 PM

clockRoom: Potomac 3-4

CE Hours: 1.2 per four (4) 15-minute sessions


Evan Alexandrou, RN, BHealth, ICU Cert, MPH, PhD

Senior Lecturer and Clinical Nurse Consultant, University of Western Sydnet and Liverpool Hospital, Sydney - NSW, Australia

Purpose / Design: The OMG Study is a global prevalence investigation being undertaken across hundreds of hospitals in over 30 countries. This study is the first of its kind to evaluate and compare the current state of Peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) use and practices from hospitals across the world to identify evidence-practice gaps. Methods: A worldwide, multi-centre observational investigation. Hospitalised patients (both adults and paediatrics) with a PIVC will be screened using a validated data collection tool which includes characteristics of device and insertion site assessment. Results: A pilot study was undertaken in February 2014 across 14 hospitals in 13 countries. A total of 527 patients were screened. Approximately 57% (n=302) had evidence of a PIVC insitu, 14 % (n= 76) had an intravascular device other than a PIVC and approximately 28% (n=149) had no device at all. Predominantly, PIVCs were inserted by nurses (65%, n= 183), and were mainly inserted in the general wards (56%, n= 158). Eighty per cent (n= 226) of PIVC dressings were clean and intact, with 9% (n=24) loose or lifting and 11% (n= 32) were moist or soiled. The phlebitis rate was approximately 4% (n=10). Limitations: The results of this pilot need to be considered within the constraints of the study design that may have inherent biases that are difficult to control in an un-randomized investigation. However the authors are confident that the large sample size of the main study will have significant implication both from a methodological and clinical perspective. Conclusions: This prevalence study is the first of its kind to be undertaken comparing PIVC use and practices from hospitals across the world. It will provide previously unavailable data on PIVC use internationally and what proportion of health care facilities utilise best practice guidelines for care and management of these devices.

Learning Objectives:

  • Articulate the concept of the OMG study and its impact in improving patient outcomes.
  • Reflect on the significance of PIVC failure rates internationally and there impact on patient care and organizational efficiency.
  • Examine the study concept and report information to their peers on this project.

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